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Full text of "Annual report"

ANNUAL REPORT 
TOWN OF IPSWICH 



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About the Cover: 

In 1984 the Town of Ipswich celebrated its 350th Anniversary 
with summer-long activities. Among the events was a spectacular 
fireworks display. (Photo by Jonathon M. Whitmore /Ipswich Chronicle) 




Board of Selectmen: 

Seated: Lawrence J. Pszenny. 

Standing (1-r): William E. George; David S. Player, Jr., 

Chairman; Arthur S. LeClair; Edwin H. Damon, Jr. 



ANNUAL REPORT 
TOWN OF IPSWICH 



1984 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

1984 ANNUAL REPORT 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Roster of Town Officials and Committees 2 

1984 Ipswich High School Graduates 5 

April 02, 1984 Annual Town Meeting 6 

Operating Budget 8 

Board of Sel ectmen 30 

Town Manager 30 

Assessor' s Office 31 

Building Inspector 31 

Cemeteries, Parks and Buildings Department 32 

Civil Defense 32 

Commuter Rail Committee 33 

Conservation Commission 34 

Dog and Animal Control Officer 34 

Fair Housing Committee 35 

Fire Department 35 

Government Study Commi ttee 36 

Hal 1 -Haskel 1 House Commi ttee 36 

Harbormaster 36 

Heal th Department 37 

Historical Commission 38 

Housing Authority 39 

Industrial Development Commission 40 

Ipswich Arts Council 41 

L i brary 41 

Planning Board 42 

Pol i ce Department 43 

Public Works Department 43 

Recreation-Youth Department 45 

School Commi ttee 46 

Superintendent of Schools 47 

High School 47 

Ralph C. Whipple Memorial School 48 

Paul F. Doyon Memorial School 49 

Winthrop School 49 

Department of Special Services 50 

350th Anniversary Committee 51 

Town Clerk 52 

Town Counsel 53 

Treasurer-Col 1 ector 53 

Veterans' Services 54 

Water/Sewer Departments 54 

Water Supply Committee 56 

Waterways Advisory Committee 56 

Zoning Board of Appeals 57 

Revenue Sharing/Handicapped Regulations 57 

Financial Statement-Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1984 58 



-1- 



CONSTABLE 
Peter Dziadose 



1984 ROSTER OF TOWN OFFICIALS AND COMMITTEES 
ELECTED 
1985 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 
James E. Carter, Ch 
Stanley Eustace 
Walter Ziemlak 
Sarah S. O'Connor 
Leland Schoen/State 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
Marjorie Robie, Ch 
Margot N. Sherwood 
Thomas B. Emery 
Joanne Caccamise 
Thomas A. Ell iott 
Judith Mulholland 
Lawrence E. Seidler 

TOWN MODERATOR 
A. James Grimes 



1988 
1985 
1986 
1989 
1986 



1987 
1985 
1985 
1986 
1986 
1987 
1987 



1985 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
E2 Elected At Town Meeting 

Edward L. Nagus 

Edward A. Wegzyn 

Walter J. Pojasek 
03 Appointed By Moderator 

William Craft, Ch 

Alice Shurcl iff 

Clarence S. Dupray 
S Appointed By Selectmen 

Peter Maistrell is 

James D. Smyth 

John Markos 

E BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

David S. Player, Jr., Ch 
William E. George 
Edwin H. Damon, Jr. 
Arthur S. LeClair 
Lawrence J. Pszenny 



SI ACCOUNTANT 
Robert H. Leet 

Ml ASSESSOR 

Frank J. Ragonese 

Ml BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Charles W. Turner 

Ml CEMETERY/PARKS SUPERINTENDENT 
James E. Graff urn 

Ml DOG OFFICER/ANIMAL INSPECTOR 
Harry W. Leno, Jr. 

Ml ENGINEER 

James E. Chase 

Ml FIRE CHIEF 

Edwin R. Emerson 

Ml HARBORMASTER 
Michael Holland 

Ml HEALTH AGENT 
Joseph Giancola 

Ml LIBRARIAN 
Eleanor Gaunt 



APPOINTED ADMINISTRATION 

Ml POLICE CHIEF 



1985 Armand R. Brouillette 

. Ml PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR 
1987 Armand T. Michaud 

Ml RECREATION DIRECTOR 
1985 Elizabeth Dorman 

Ml SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 
Philip Kent 

6 SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
1985 Richard F. Thompson 

Ml TOWN CLERK 

Isabel N. Coulombe 

Ml TOWN COUNSEL 

Charles C. Dalton 

S TOWN MANAGER 
1985 George E. Howe 

SI TREASURER/COLLECTOR 
1985 George C. Mourikas 

Ml DEPUTY COLLECTOR 
Will iam Handren 



M BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
Frank J. Ragonese 
John Moberger 
John D. Heaphy 



APPOINTED BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 

S CATV COMMITTEE 

1987 George E. Howe 

1985 Glenn Bayley 

1986 

-2- 



1985 
1986 
1987 

1985 
1986 
1987 

1985 
1986 
1987 



1986 
1985 
1986 
1987 
1987 



1985 
1986 



1987 
1985 
1986 
1986 



1985 
1985 



M5 



03 



Kenneth L. Goodhue, Ch 


1985 


Gordon C. Player 


1986 


Nicholas Markos 


1987 


CIVIL DEFENSE 




David Clements, Dir 


1985 


John T. Clogston, Asst 


1985 


COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 




Dorcas Rice, Ch 


1985 


James Berry 


1985 


Wayne King 


1985 


Vivian Endicott 


1985 


Joseph Carl in 


1985 


Wil 1 iam Varrell 


1985 


James McC. Hayward 


1985 


CONSERVATION COMMISSION 




Lillian V. North, Ch 


1987 


Costos Tsoutsouris 


1985 


David Crestin 


1985 


Nora J. Mitchell 


1986 


Will iam E. Barton 


1986 


George E. Hovey 


1987 


Edward Sukach 


1987 


COUNCIL ON AGING 




Winfred Hardy, Ch 


1986 


Thomas Emery 


1985 


Charles P. Sheppard 


1985 


Arthur Goodfellow 


1986 


Marion Rogers 


1986 


Gertrude Emery 


1987 


Helen Drenth 


1987 


FAIR HOUSING COMMITTEE 




Natalie Gaynor, Ch 


1985 


Rev. Merle Pimentel 


1985 


Thomas L. Moscarillo 


1985 


Tone Kenney 


1985 


Sara O'Connor 


1985 


Stephanie Nagle 


1985 


Susan Nelson 


1985 


Nancy Carter 


1985 


Marion Middlebrooks 


1985 


GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 




Constance Surpitski, Ch 


1985 


Douglas Laterowicz 


1985 


Steven A. Walsh 


1985 


HALL-HASKELL HOUSE COMMITTEE 




Vivian Endicott 


1985 


Terry Stevens 


1985 


Helen M. Burr 


1985 


Alice Keenan 


1985 


Cathleen R. McGinley 


1985 



M BOARD OF HEALTH 

Constance Surpitski, Ch 
Kenneth L. Zinn, M.D. 
David Carleton 

M5 HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
Mary P. Conley, Ch 
Lovell Thompson 
Alice Keenan 
Ruthanne Rogers 
George R. Mathey 
Faith Bryan 
Barbara Emberly 



1986 
1985 
1987 



1985 
1985 
1985 
1986 
1987 
1987 
1987 



M INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

Paul R. Beswick, Ch 1988 

Bruce F. Paul 1985 

Philip Lang 1985 

Stephen L. Dietch 1986 

Warren P. Russo 1987 

James M. Nelson 1987 

S INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT FINANCING 
AUTHORITY 

George E. Howe, Ch 1986 

Loretta Dietch 1985 

James C. Lahar 1987 

F. Dale Vincent, Jr. 1988 

Richard Emery 1989 



IPSWICH ARTS COUNCIL 
Janet T. Craft 
Marion W. Swan 
Bette L. Siegel 
Peter M. Juntunen 
Jane E. Reiman 
Helen Eames 
Charles Dort 
Barbara King 
Barbara J. Waitt 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES 
Crocker Snow, Sr., Ch 
Phyllis E. Bruce 
Kathryn G. Klinger 
Virginia Jackson 
Harris Smith 
Louise Sweetser 
Hubert Johnson 
Steven Brody 
Al ice Keenan 

PLANNING BOARD 
Barbara F. Ostberg, Ch 
James M. Warner 
Albert Harkness, III 
Patrick J. McNally 
Wayne C. King 



1986 
1985 
1985 
1985 
1985 
1985 
1985 
1986 
1986 



1986 
1985 
1985 
1985 
1986 
1986 
1987 
1987 
1987 



1985 
1986 
1987 
1988 
1989 



-3- 



M RECREATION COMMISSION 
Kenneth Spellman, Ch 
Timothy Bishop 
Linda M. Murphy 
Charles Surpitski 
Mark J. Perrone 
Douglas Woodworth 
Barry W. Hopping 

S REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Marion Middlebrooks 

John Kobos 

Boley Radzinski 
Ml Isobel N. Coulombe, Clerk 

S SHELLFISH ADVISORY BOARD 
Warren Jepson, Ch 
Joanne D. Soffron 
Alice H. Thanos 
Andrew Gianakakis 
Forrest W. MacGilvary 
Thomas Dorman 
Robert Kneel and 
Will iam A. Grover 
Anthony Christopher 

S TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 
Elton McCausland, Ch 
Peter Owsiak 
Sturgis P. Papagiotis 

S WATER SUPPLY COMMITTEE 
James Engel , Ch 
Robert Comeau 
Scott Greeley 
Robert 0. Butcher 
Gerald Pristman 

S WATERWAYS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
George C. Scott, Jr., Ch 
Jane Rieman 
Will iam A. Barton 
Marc C. Silverman 
Warren P. Russo 
Charles J. Orrell 

S ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 
James Theodosopoulos, Ch 
Daniel B. Lunt, Jr. 
Mary E. Fosdick 
Allen G. Swan 
William J. Murphy 
John R. Verani, Alt 
Jeffrey Simon, Alt 

M BELL RINGER 
Stanley Eustace 

M GAS INSPECTOR 
A.N.D. Hyde 



M INSECT PEST CONTROL SUPERINTENDENT 



1985 


Armand T. Michaud 


1985 


1985 






1986 


M PARKING CLERK 




1986 


Wil 1 iam Handren 


1985 


1987 






1987 


M PLUMBING INSPECTOR 




1988 


A.N.D. Hyde 
M ALTERNATE PLUMBING INSPECTOR 


C.S. 


1985 


David W. French 


C.S. 


1986 






1987 


M SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 




1987 


Normand J. Bedard 
M WIRING INSPECTOR 


1985 


1985 


Raymond Budzianowski 


1985 


1985 






1985 


S 350th ANNIVERSARY COMMITTEE 




1985 


Joseph W. Carpenter, Ch 


1985 


1985 


Boley Radzinski 


1985 


1985 


Anne Marchand 


1985 


1985 


Larry Pszenny 


1985 


1985 


Evelyn Pszenny 


1985 


1985 


Jaye 0. Clark 


1985 




Elizabeth Newton 


1985 




Mary P. Con ley 


1985 


1986 


Elizabeth Dorman 


1985 


1985 


Alice Keenan 


1985 


1987 


Nancy Parker 


1985 




Donald Gaspar 


1985 




Linda Murphy 


1985 


1985 


Arthur S. LeClair 


1985 


1985 


Shirley Dupray 


1985 


1985 


Charlotte Dodge 


1985 


1985 


Elizabeth Kilcoyne 


1985 


1985 


Kenneth Richards 


1985 




Frances Richards 


1985 




GerryAnn Brown 


1985 


1985 


David Carleton 


1985 


1985 


Vivian Endicott 


1985 


1985 


Edwin Emerson 


1985 


1985 


Alice Moseley 


1985 


1985 


Ann Reynolds 


1985 


1985 


Al Howes 


1985 




Norman Stone, Jr. 


1985 




Joe Gajewski 


1985 


1987 


Dorothy Brigham 


1985 


1985 


Tom Emery 


1985 


1986 


Herb Tougas 


1985 


1988 


Janet Mackay-Smith 


1985 


1989 


Armand Michaud 


1985 


1985 


James Graffum 


1985 


1985 


Donald Stone 


1985 




Pierre Doucet 


1985 




Bonnie Graves 


1985 


1985 


Debi Johnson 


1985 




Glenn Boutchie' (Essex Rep.) 


1985 


C.S. 


(Legend on Following Page) 





-4- 



Appointment Legend 

E Elected 

S Appointed By Board of Selectmen 

M Appointed By Town Manager 

Other 

1 Supervised By Town Manager 

2 Elected At Town Meeting 

3 Appointed By Moderator 

4 General Laws 

5 Confirmed By Board of Selectmen 

6 Appointed By School Committee 



1984 HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES 



Kimberley Abbott 
Eileen Marie Adams 
Erik R. Amundsen 
Kelly Anderson 
Lisa Marie Andrews 
Shannon Barnhart 
Thomas Beedle 
S. Michael Bennett 
T. Scott Best 
Susan Jane Bolognese 
Linda Borgatti 
Dana Ralph Bracey 
Mark Brasier 
Lisa Brouillette 
Nancy M. Brown 
Kevin Burek 
Deirdre Burke 
Stacey Dianne Butters 
Joseph Carpenter 
Constance Ann Chi Ids 
Kristian William Clapp 
Gary A. Coll urn 
Theodore W. Cooke 
Jeffrey Coughlin 
James Couturier 
Brenda Mary Crawford 
Elizabeth A. Darnell 
Matthew Davidson 
Jeffrey Dolan 
Kathleen Ann Donaher 
Trevor J. Drinkwater 
Thomas A. Ercoline, III 
Joanne Margaret Erickson 
David H. Ewing 
Daniel F. Finkenthal 
Stephanie L. Fisher 
Lorraine Mae Fowler 
Brian Gagnon 
Kathleen A. Gagnon 
James Goguen 
Jonathan Hannibal 
William G. Hayes 
Andrew G. Hill 



Jessica L. Hopkins 
Britt A. Hultgren 
Katrin Drew Hultgren 
Lisa A. Huntley 
Linda Susan Jellison 
Kenneth M. Jewell 
Heather Kauffman 
Diane Kavanaugh 
Dawn Michel le Kelley 
Genevieve Kimbal 1 
Michael Kisiel 
Mel issa Sue Kleiner 
Christine Knowlton 
Christopher D. Landrum 
Jennifer Ann Leamy 
Maryanne Katherine Lees 
Robert A. Leet 
Julie M. Leonard 
Patricia Eileen Linehan 
Elizabeth Logan 
Kristin Lombard 
Sharyl Spring Lynn 
Gail Marcorelle 
Vincent J. Marini 
Laurie J. Martin 
Robert D. Martineau 
Vincent Martineau 
David Mastrangelo 
Elish M. McDonnell 
Louisa H. McGarty 
Amy Beth McGrath 
Lesl ie A. McLaughl in 
John M. McTighe 
Giselle G. Middlebrooks 
Leslie Judith Morison 
Alex. B.C. Mulholland, III 
Deborah E. Muller 
Nicole Marie Muise 
Matthew A. Naimie 
Sidney Scott Noe 
Mark P. O'Connor 
Edwin S. Ogiba, Jr. 
Timothy G. Pappas 

-5- 



Christine J. Parady 
Mary-Jean Paulitz 
Wendy Maria Pierce 
Robert S. Price, Jr. 
Edward B. Rauscher 
William E. Reynolds, Jr. 
Jonathan Rice 
Amy Richard 
Marc P. Rogers 
Barbara Ann Rosato 
Caren J. Rousseau 
William E. Rousseau, Jr.' 
Daniel B. Rowland 
Charles Santiago 
Mie Sato 

Eva Marie Schofield 
Heidi Michele Schwartz 
David Siegel 
William Siegel 
Eric Robert Sklarz 
Michael Smolak 
Steven Somers 
Jessica Elise Soucy 
David F. Spencer 
Russell P. Spencer 
Joseph E. Stasiuk 
Patricia Alice Stevens 
Debra Star Stone 
Scott Allen Stone 
Janet Strok 
David C. Sturtevant 
Stephen William Thompson 
Phil ip Tremblay 
Emily Sull i van 
Paulette Monique Valcour 
Jennifer Varrel 1 
Cynthia Anne Walsh 
Eileen C. Whooley 
Rande Robert Wile 
Enoch F. Will ard 
Kimberly Ann Wilson 
Brian Winter 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

Ipswich High School April 02, 1984 

ESSEX, ss 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 
GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you are hereby directed to no- 
tify the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in Town affairs, 
to meet at the Ipswich High School, in said Ipswich on 

MONDAY, THE SECOND DAY OF APRIL, 1984 
at 7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and there to act on the following articles, 
viz: 

A quorum of 346 was not present at 7:30 p.m. and it was moved, seconded and voted 
to postpone the start of the Meeting for 15 minutes. A quorum was reached at 
7:50 p.m. and the Moderator called the Meeting to order. The Pledge of Alle- 
giance to the Flag was led by Superintendent of Schools Richard Thompson. The 
final count was 551 . 

Tellers appointed by the Moderator were: Nancy Carter, Melissa Kleiner, Raymond 
Barrows, Stephanie Nagle, John Hansbury, and Leslie McLaughlin. 

It was moved, seconded and voted to allow non-voters in to watch the proceedings. 

ARTICLE 1 

To fix the salary and compensation of all elected Town Officers. 

Chairman of the Board of Selectmen David S. Player, Jr. moved that the salary and 
compensation of all elected Town Officers be fixed as presented in the budget. 
Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 2 

To choose the following officers, viz: Constable for one (1) year; Moderator for 
one (1) year; Two (2) Selectmen for three (3) years; Three (3) Members of the 
School Committee for three (3) years; One (1) Member of the Housing Authority for 
five (5) years; one (1) Member of the Housing Authority for four (4) years; and 
one (1) Member of the Housing Authority for two (2) years. 

The above officers to be voted on one ballot at their respective polling places 
as follows: Precinct 1 Agawam Village, County Road; Precinct 2 Winthrop School, 
Central Street; Princint 3 Ipswich High School, High Street; Precinct 4 Ipswich 
Housing Authority Recreation Hall, Caroline Avenue; on Monday April 09, 1984. 
The polls shall open at 10:00 a.m. and close at 8:00 p.m.; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Selectman William E. George moved that the Town choose the following officers, 
viz: Constable for one (1) year; Moderator for one (1) year; Two (2) Selectmen 
for three (3) years; Three (3) Members of the School Committee for three (3) 
years; One (1) Member of the Housing Authority for five (5) years; one (1) Member 
of the Housing Authority for four (4) years; and one (1) Member of the Housing 
Authority for two (2) years. 

The above officers to be voted on one ballot at their respective polling places 
as follows: Precinct 1 Agawam Village, County Road; Precinct 2 Winthrop School, 
Central Street; Princint 3 Ipswich High School, High Street; Precinct 4 Ipswich 
Housing Authority Recreation Hall, Caroline Avenue; on Monday April 09, 1984. 
The polls shall open at 10:00 a.m. and close at 8:00 p.m. Seconded. Unanimous 
voice vote. 

-6- 



ARTICLE 3 

To see if the Town will vote by official ballot on Monday, April 09, 1984 to 
accept the provisions of Section 11A of Chapter 32B of the General Laws, as 
amended, to purchase additional group life and group accidental death and dismem- 
berment insurance for employees with no premium contribution by the Town; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman Edwin H. Damon, Jr. moved that the Town vote by official ballot on 
Monday, April 09, 1984 to accept the provisions of Section 11A of Chapter 32B of 
the General Laws, by placing on said Official Ballot the following question: 
"Shall the Town purchase additional group life and group accidental death and 
dismemberment insurance for employees in accordance with the provisions of Chap- 
ter 32B of the General Laws with no premium contribution by the Town?" Seconded 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 4 

To choose one (1) Member of the Finance Committee for three (3) years. 

Mr. Player nominated Walter Pojasek to serve on the Finance Committee for three 
(3) years. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended, with 
both boards commending Mr. Pojasek for being fair and progressive, and doing a 
good job. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 5 

To hear and act upon the report of the Finance Committee relative to the munici- 
pal budget and to raise, appropriate, and transfer money for the ensuing year, 
including the compensation of elected Town Officers, and to authorize the expen- 
diture of a sum of monies from the Federal General Revenue Sharing account for 
the aforementioned purposes; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Finance Committee Chairman William Craft moved that the Town raise and appropri- 
ate the sum of $4,335,003 for the purposes indicated in the operating budget: 

For the Operating Budget (see detail) $4,335,003 

Transfer from Available Funds: 

Surplus Revenue (Free Cash) 105,102 

Sewer Unreserved Fund Balance 90,648 

Sewer Reserved Retained Earnings 150,190 

Sewer Betterment Receipts 23,300 

Water Pollution Control and Chemicals 8,968 

Library Aid 5,579 

County Dog Fund 1,122 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 7,137 

Cemetery Flower Fund 3,115 

Overlay Surplus to Reserve Fund 45,000 

Transfer from Revenue Sharing: 

Sanitation Contract 188,500 

Highway - Surface Treatment 85,450 

Available Funds and Revenue Sharing: 714,111 

Net To Be Raised and Assessed $3,620,892 



-7- 



OPERATING BUDGET 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT 









FY84 


FY85 




FY82 


FY83 


Appro- 


Recom- 




Expended 


Expended 


priated 


mended 


003 SELECTMEN: 










Salaries & Wages 


$ 6,869 


$ 10,315 


$ 10,946 $ 


13,855 


Expenses 


1,774 


1,609 


2,093 


2,320 


Total 


8,643 


11,924 


13,039 


16,175 


005 TOWN MANAGER: 










Salaries & Wages 


57,570 


62,186 


67,322 


74,453 


Expenses 


13,160 


13,204 


14,236 


15,372 


Labor Consultants 


6,624 


7,894 


5,000 


5,000 


Capital Outlay 





60 


8,883 


3,500 


Total 


77,354 


83,344 


95,441 


98,325 


009 MODERATOR: 










Salary 


100 


100 


100 


100 


Expenses 





10 


10 


10 


Total 


100 


110 


110 


110 


Oil FINANCE COMMITTEE: 










Salaries & Wages 








50 


50 


Expenses 


1,726 


1,517 


2,650 


2,650 


Total 


1,726 


1,517 


2,700 


2,700 


015 ELECTIONS & REGISTRATION: 










Salaries & Wages 


5,712 


11,214 


10,471 


16,823 


Expenses 


3,684 


3,874 


4,300 


4,100 


Total 


9,396 


15,088 


14,771 


20,923 


025 ACCOUNTANT: 










Salaries & Wages 


55,556 


60,269 


65,083 


68,164 


Expenses 


3,000 


7,854 


10,400 


18,070 


Total 


58,556 


68,123 


75,483 


86,234 


029 ASSESSORS: 










Salaries & Wages 


51,057 


55,216 


59,575 


64,165 


Expenses 


7,986 


8,789 


6,755 


7,470 


Capital Outlay 


150 





120 


600 


Total 


59,193 


64,004 


66,450 


72,235 


033 TREASURER/COLLECTOR: 










Salaries & Wages 


51,111 


70,260 


77,691 


84,184 


Expenses 


10,483 


11,781 


17,691 


15,055 


Capital Outlay 


4,582 











Total 


76,176 


82,041 


95,382 


99,239 


039 TOWN CLERK: 










Salaries & Wages 


27,303 


27,159 


30,911 


33,306 


Expenses 


1,596 


1,248 


1,495 


2,290 


Capital Outlay 








1,317 


2,550 


Total 


28,899 


28,407 


33,723 


38,146 


045 LEGAL DEPARTMENT: 










Salaries & Wages 


9,074 


9,074 


9,074 


10,000 


Town Counsel -Litigation 


12,185 


15,038 


11,000 


16,000 



-8- 



1,779 
23,038 


980 
25,092 


1,084 
21,158 


1,124 
27,124 


520 
245 
765 


485 
263 

748 


550 
316 
866 


770 
205 
975 


593 

247 


1,200 
241 


1,200 
475 


1,500 
800 



7,724 
8,564 



1,000 
2,441 


1,000 
1,000 
3,675 


10,000 



12,300 


10,521 

18,057 





28,578 


12,524 

20,303 

6,645 



39,472 


13,816 

13,185 

7,225 



34,226 


13,983 

14,805 

8,635 

1,550 

38,973 



Expenses 
Total 

061 APPEALS BOARD: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 

063 PLANNING BOARD: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Planning Consultants: 

Reimbursable 

General 
Total 

065 TOWN HALL & ANNEX: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Suppl ies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 380,988 422,301 457,024 513,459 



101 POLICE DEPARTMENT: 
Salaries & Wages 

Chief Base 

Sergeants Base 

Patrolmen Base 

Incentive 

Hoi iday 

Overtime 

Shift Differential 

Court Fees 

Other Salaries 

Uniform Payments 
Total Salaries 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

103 FIRE DEPARTMENT: 
Salaries & Wages 
Chief Base 
Lieutenants Base 
• Firefighters Base 
Overtime 

Call Capt (1) & Call Lieut 
Call Operators (8) 
Call Men (32) 
Acting Officers 
Incentive & Differential 
Hoi iday 
Uniform Payments 



PUBLIC SAFETY 








29,508 


31,593 


33,782 




78,280 


61,532 


85,462 




258,139 


292,037 


298,128 




39,820 


47,806 


48,594 




18,928 


18,769 


20,365 




15,528 


14,174 


18,925 




6,351 


6,543 


7,212 




9,230 


10,285 


12,450 




19,969 


17,600 


32,786 







8,000 


8,000 




475,753 


508,339 


565,704 


595,108 


69,069 


17,606 


18,590 


18,673 





24,024 


19,380 


19,310 


3,359 


27,551 


11,043 


15,012 


548,181 


577,520 


614,717 


648,103 


25,457 


27,239 


29,146 




70,097 


75,912 


82,900 




170,960 


192,815 


212,515 




19,590 


13,376 


19,000 




3) 3,917 


4,300 


4,100 




3,162 


2,492 


800 




22,500 


22,610 


28,800 










750 




1,770 


2,777 


2,250 




11,932 


13,047 


14,544 







4,673 


4,500 





-9- 



Total Salaries 


329,385 


359,241 


399,305 


402,123 


Training 








5,275 


1,300 


Expenses 


34,173 


34,759 


23,154 


32,345 


Energy Suppl ies 





3,055 


6,885 


7,850 


Fire Alarm Box Decommissioning 











3,000 


Capital Outlay 


10,912 


6,740 


14,595 


27,987 


Total 


374,470 


403,795 


449,214 


474,605 


109 FORESTRY: 










Salaries & Wages 


42,229 


46,723 


51,696 


53,307 


Expenss 


31,280 


15,245 


18,012 


19,719 


Energy Suppl ies 





4,134 


4,619 


3,930 


Capital Outlay 


915 


4,009 


1,000 


2,500 


Total 


74,424 


70,111 


75,327 


79,456 


111 HARBORS: 










Salaries 





3,877 


4,000 


11,300 


Expenses 





2,578 


2,240 


4,262 


Energy Suppl ies 





1,098 


171 


675 


Capital Outlay 











800 


Total 





7,553 


6,411 


17,037 


112 SHELLFISH: 










Salaries & Wages 


20,282 


19,644 


25,420 


25,932 


Expenses 


6,553 


3,893 


4,295 


3,870 


Consultants 











1,000 


Energy Suppl ies 





1,099 


1,705 


1,060 


Capital Outlay 


1,988 





1,500 


9,500 


Total 


28,823 


24,636 


32,920 


41,362 


113 BUILDING INSPECTOR: 










Salaries & Wages 


19,143 


20,975 


20,197 


25,679 


Expenses 


1,607 


1,554 


1,875 


2,820 


Capital Outlay 











350 


Total 


20,750 


22,529 


22,072 


28,849 


131 CIVIL DEFENSE: 










Salaries & Wages 


2,400 


2,400 


2,400 


2,400 


Expenses 


1,585 


864 


1,560 


1,650 


Energy Suppl ies 








100 


100 


Capital Outlay 








750 





Total 


3,985 


3,264 


4,810 


4,150 


133 ANIMAL CONTROL: 










Salaries & Wages 


12,000 


12,840 


13,739 


14,600 


Expenses 


3,173 


2,340 


2,533 


2,666 


Energy Suppl ies 





1,019 


890 


890 


Capital Outlay 











1,880 


Total 


15,173 


16,199 


17,162 


20,036 


TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY: 


1,065,806 
PUBLIC WORKS 


1,125,607 


1,222,633 


1,313,598 


301 ADMINISTRATION: 










Salaries & Wages 


33,951 


36,328 


38,865 


41,296 


Expenses 


1,422 


1,434 


1,660 


' 1,937 


Total 


35,373 


37,762 


40,525 


43,233 



-10- 



102,232 


110,734 


121,817 


128,174 


168,530 


184,637 


130,457 


154,457 








125,000 


125,000 


2,193 


2,797 


32,353 


57,973 


272,955 


298,168 


409,627 


465,604 


25,691 


17,052 


15,000 


15,000 


52,927 


33,346 


39,875 


39,875 





5,670 


3,500 


3,500 


18,823 


14,855 


12,000 


12,000 


97,441 


70,923 


70,375 


70,375 


16,274 


18,551 


20,573 


21,518 


35,726 


33,486 


30,320 


30,470 





10,050 


15,584 


13,888 


1,500 





2,700 


15,000 


53,500 


62,087 


69,177 


80,876 



303 HIGHWAY DIVISION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Road Treatment 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

305 SNOW & ICE CONTROL: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Rental 
Total 

309 EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS: 459,269 468,940 589,704 660,088 

SANITATION 
403 SANITATION CONTRACT: 

Sanitation Composite Contract 
Spring & Fall Cleaning 
Total 

409 SEWER: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Suppl ies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL SANITATION: 473,038 487,515 519,044 569,091 

OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES 
481 HISTORICAL COMMISSION: 



220,000 


237,000 


237,000 


260,500 


8,000 


8,000 


8,000 


8,000 


228,000 


245,000 


245,000 


268,500 


93,327 


120,397 


133,310 


140,227 


149,206 


110,963 


125,905 


147,976 





9,445 


13,289 


10,388 


2,505 


1,710 


1,540 


2,000 


245,038 


242,515 


274,044 


300,591 



Expenses 


100 


137 


500 


600 


Total 


100 


137 


500 


600 


CONSERVATION COMMISSION: 










Salaries & Wages 


258 


916 


1,000 


1,000 


Expenses 


310 


504 


870 


810 


Capital Outlay 


488 


694 


1,000 


1,300 


Total 


1,056 


2,114 


2,870 


3,110 



TOTAL OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES 1,156 2,251 3,370 3,710 





HUMAN SERVICES 








501 HEALTH: 










Salaries & Wages 


35,466 


34,096 


35,042 


41,451 


Expenses 


45,979 


56,596 


71,628 


73,551 


Total 


81,445 


90,692 


106,670 


115,002 



-11- 



531 COUNCIL ON AGING: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 

551 VETERANS BENEFITS: 
Expenses 
Total 

571 CEMETERIES & GROUNDS 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Suppl ies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES: 



72 


3,415 


3,640 


3,920 


8,611 


7,799 


11,639 


12,514 


8,683 


11,214 


15,279 


16,434 


82,255 


89,465 


100,500 


104,500 


82,255 


89,465 


100,500 


104,500 


100,921 


116,902 


128,716 


135,192 


32,175 


16,261 


20,231 


20,387 





7,852 


9,631 


9,930 


6,265 


1,252 


11,300 


13,620 


139,361 


142,267 


169,878 


179,129 



311,744 



333,638 



392,327 415,323 



CULTURE & RECREATION 



601 LIBRARY: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenss 

Energy Supples 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

621 RECREATION & YOUTH SERVICES: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Suppl ies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL CULTURE & RECREATION: 



80,480 


91,670 


101,690 


106,919 


37,705 


37,405 


39,378 


42,275 





2,589 


2,634 


2,800 


65 


6,107 


5,180 


3,660 


118,250 


137,771 


148,882 


155,654 


26,126 


29,668 


35,513 


40,588 


13,853 


14,431 


17,599 


16,904 





858 


682 


1,075 








375 


375 


39,979 


44,957 


54,169 


58,942 



158,229 



182,728 



203,051 214,596 



069 INSURANCE: 
Unemployment 
Motor Vehicle 
Workmen's Compensation 
Package Insurance 
Public Official Bonds 
Legal Liability 
Total 

069 BENEFITS: 

Military Svc. Credits 
County Retirement System 
Health & Life 
Total 

701 DEBT SERVICE: 

Payment of Interest 
Payment of Principal 
Total 



UNCLASSIFIED 









15 


2,000 


12,618 


14,333 


14,652 


28,984 


32,909 


37,048 


21,128 


20,404 


23,219 


736 


738 


812 


5,642 





5,925 


69,108 


68,399 


83,656 


16,502 


10,145 


17,857 


275,512 


387,769 


274,055 


175,452 


137,941 


79,006 


467,466 


535,855 


370,918 


45,831 


32,533 


23,136 


266,500 


282,871 


133,500 


312,331 


214,404 


156,636 



85,115 



383,159 



106,122 



-12- 



3,626 


4,160 


3,900 


33,687 


45,000 


45,000 


10,826 


10,000 


10,000 


10,659 


10,700 


12,100 


877,456 


681,070' 


645,396 



069 OFFICE EQUIPMENT: 3,729 

013 RESERVE FUND: (See Schedule) 22,566 
701 INTEREST ON TAX ANTICIPATION NOTES: 3,790 
069 POSTAGE: 9,000 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED: 887,900 

TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET: $3,738,220 $3,900,436 $4,068,223 $4,335,003 

Seconded. Finance Committee recommended, Board of Selectmen unanimously recom- 
mended. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 6 

To hear and act upon the report of the Finance Committee and the School Committee 

relative to the School Department budget and to raise, appropriate, and transfer 

money for the ensuing year's operations; or to take any other action relative 

thereto. 

Chairman of the School Committee Marjorie Robie moved that the sum of $5,070,000 
be raised and appropriated for the School Department Budget: 

For the School Department Budget $5,070,000 
Transfer From Available Funds: 

Feoffees of the Grammar School 2,500 

Net To Be Raised and Assessed $5,067,500 

Seconded. Superintendent Thompson gave a brief report on the state of the School 
Department. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous voice 
vote. 

ARTICLE 7 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to cover the 
Town's share of the annual operating and debt service expenses of the Whittier 
Regional Vocational Technical High School District; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Selectman Arthur S. LeClair moved that the Town vote to approve, raise and appro- 
priate in accordance with Chapter 71, Section 16B, the sum of $90,208.00 to cover 
the Town's share of the annual operating expenses of the Whittier Regional Voca- 
tional Technical High School District, and that the Town vote to approve the 
operating budget for the fiscal year 1985 for the Whittier District in the amount 
of $7,032,349.00. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. 
Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 8 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the cur- 
rent expenses of the Water Division, same to be paid for by revenues of the Water 
Division during FY85, and to transfer a sum of money from the surplus account to 
Water, Plant and Investment and to change the purpose for the remaining balance 
in the Seaview Road water main construction account to general water main con- 
struction and replacement; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. George moved that the Town vote (1) to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$300,557 for the current expenses of the Water Division, the same to be paid for 
by revenues of the Water Division during FY85; (2) to transfer the sum of $43,960 



-13- 



from the Water Surplus Account to the Water Plant and Investment Account; and (3) 
to change the purpose of the remaining $9,840.34 balance in the Seaview Road 
Water Main Account to "General Water Main Construction and Replacement". Sec- 
onded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Ronald Hamlin of 16 
Seaview Road, who had registered too late to vote, asked to speak. It was so 
moved, seconded, and voted. He said that he had been told by the Board of Select- 
men that there would be a final resurfacing of Seaview Road; the Town Manager in- 
formed him that that is still to be done. Motion carried on a unanimous voice 
vote. 

ARTICLE 9 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) To raise and appropriate a sum of money and/or 
transfer from available funds a sum of money to pay unpaid bills incurred in pre- 
vious years and remaining unpaid; (2) To raise and appropriate a sum of money 
and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money to pay unpaid bills incurred 
by the Library during the current year; and (3) To raise and appropriate a sum 
of money and/or to appropriate a sum of money from the Water Division surplus 
account to pay any Water Division unpaid bills incurred in previous years and 
remaining unpaid; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. LeClair moved that the Town vote (1) to transfer from free cash the sum of 

$2,534.73 to pay unpaid bills incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid, 
viz: 

Zoning Board of Appeals 

North Shore Weeklies $ 9.50 
Harbormaster 

John Costoplus 131.25 

Russell Grant 100.00 
Fire Department 

Donahue Motor Co. 11.62 
Town Hal 1 

Electric Department 328.55 

Water & Sewer Depatments 30.84 
School Department 

Holt, Rinehart and Winston 27.52 

Savin Corp. 100.00 

Stones Journal 223.25 

Loom 'N Shuttle 4.79 

Morgan, Brown & Joy 786.00 

Carlene Barous 200.00 

American Assn. of School Admin. 47.50 

J.L. Hammett Company 14.45 

Media for Education 16.95 

NEMMCC0 129.75 
Shellfish Department 

Paul's Auto & Truck Repair 39.00 
Treasurer/Col lector 

Rowley Printing 333.76 

GENERAL FUND SUBTOTAL $ 2,534.73; 

(2) to transfer from the Library Trust Fund the sum of $19,000 to pay unpaid 

bills incurred earlier this year and remaining unpaid, viz: 
Library Department 

Anderson; Notter; Finegold Architects $19,000.00; 
and (3) to transfer from Sewer Unreserved Fund Balance the sum of $9,917.15 to 
pay unpaid Sewer Division bills incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid, 
viz: 

Sewer Division 

Electric Department $ 9,903.07 

Essex Office Associates 14.08. 

-14- 



Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Richard Ingram of 
Manning Street asked for clarification of the Library Funds; Town Counsel gave a 
brief history. A four-fifths vote was necesary; the voice vote was inconclusive; 
on the hand count, the motion passed 479-3. 

ARTICLE 10 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money and/or to 
transfer a sum of money from available funds or from the Federal General Revenue 
Sharing Account to fund supplements to the Town and School operating budgets for 
FY84; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Damon moved that the Town vote (1) to transfer from Free Cash the sum of 
$78,327 to fund supplements to the FY84 Town and School Operating Budgets, viz: 
Miscellaneous Finance 
Health Insurance $30,686 

Workmen's Compensation Insurance 11,285 

Building Inspector 

Salaries and Wages 3,500 

Highway Department 
Salaries and Wages 700 

Council on Aging 
Expenses 600 

Assessing 

Expenses 2,000 

School Department 29,556; 

and (2) to transfer from Sewer Unreserved Fund Balance the sum of $28,490 to fund 
supplements to the FY84 Sewer Division Budget, viz: 
Sewer Division 

Salaries and Wages $ 2,225 

Expenses 26,265. 

Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous voice 
vote. 

ARTICLE 11 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time, in anticipation of the rev- 
enue for the financial year beginning July 01, 1984, and ending June 30, 1985, in 
accordance with the provisions of the General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, as 
amended, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than 
one year, in accordance with the provisions of the General Laws, Chapter 44, Sec- 
tion 17, as amended; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Player moved that the Town vote to authorize the Treasurer, with the approval 
of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time, in anticipation of 
the revenue for the financial year beginning July 01, 1984, and ending June 30, 
1985, in accordance with the provisions of the General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 
4, as amended, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of 
less than one year, in accordance with the provisions of the General Laws, Chap- 
ter 44/ Section 17, as amended. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee 
recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 12 

To see what action the Town will take in regard to the transfer of any surplus 

funds in the Electric Light Department. 

Mr. Pszenny moved that the Town vote to transfer the sum of $88,038 from the Sur- 
plus Account in the Electric Light Department for the purpose of reducing taxes. 



-15- 



Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous voice 
vote. 

ARTICLE 13 

To see if the Town will vote, pursuant to Chapter 53, Section 18A of the General 
Laws to place the following nonbinding public opinion advisory question on the 
ballot for the next regular municipal election: "Are you in favor of permitting 
the construction and operation of a MacDonald's type restaurant with take-out 
window service on High Street in a Highway Business Zone District?"; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Mr. LeClair moved that the Town vote, pursuant to Chapter 53, Section 18A of the 
General Laws to place the following nonbinding public opinion advisory question 
on the ballot for the next regular municipal election: "Are you in favor of per- 
mitting the construction and operation of a MacDonald's type restaurant with take- 
out window service on High Street in a Highway Business Zone District?". Sec- 
onded. The Board of Selectmen felt this issue should be put on the ballot so 
that the people can let the Planning and Zoning Appeals Boards know their feel- 
ings. Finance Committee recommended. Lawrence Morse spoke against the motion; 
Edwin Smith, who authored the petition, and Clarence Dupray spoke in favor. 
Question was moved, seconded, so voted. The voice vote was inconclusive on the 
main motion; the hand count was 361 in favor, 143 against. 

ARTICLE 14 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the pur- 
pose of promotion of the Town of Ipswich, an equal sum of money to be made avail- 
able for said purposes from the Chamber of Commerce; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Mr. George moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,000 
for the purpose of promotion of the Town of Ipswich, an equal sum of money to be 
made available for said purposes from the Chamber of Commerce. Seconded. 
Stephanie Nagle spoke for the Chamber. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee 
recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 15 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to raise and appropriate a sum of money for 
the construction and maintenance of roads and bridges under Chapter 90 of the 
General Laws, as amended; (2) To authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, 
to accept, and expend any Federal and/or State grants which may be available for 
the aforementioned purposes; and (3) To authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire such easements and/or other interest(s) as may be necessary to effectuate 
said construction and maintenance by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or 
otherwise; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Damon moved that the Town vote: (1) to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$65,500 for the construction and maintenance of roads and bridges under Chapter 
90 of the General Laws, as amended; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
apply for, to accept, and expend any Federal and/or State grants which may be 
available for the aforementioned purposes; and (3) to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other interest(s) as may be necessary 
to effectuate said construction and maintenance by purchase, gift, lease, eminent 
domain or otherwise. Seconded. This money will be used to straighten another 
section of Linebrook Road. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. 
Edward Greenburg felt that High Street needed repairing more than Linebrook; the 
Manager assured him it was scheduled to be done. A two-thirds vote was needed 
because of eminent domain; the voice vote was unanimous. 



-16- 



ARTICLE 16 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to raise and appropriate or to transfer from 
available funds a sum of money to engage engineering services and to acquire any 
related materiel and/or services for the repair of town-owned and maintained 
bridges; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, to accept, and 
expend any Federal and/or State grants which may be available for the aforemen- 
tioned purposes; and (3) To authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire such ease- 
ments and/or other interest(s) as may be necessary to effectuate said repairs, by 
the purchase, by gift, by lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Player moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum of $39,084.00 of 
which $34,429.61 shall be raised by taxes, and to transfer from accounts 302-921 
and 900-015 the sums of $1,553.80 and $3,100.53, respectively, to engage engineer- 
ing services and to acquire any related materiel and/or services for the repair 
of town-owned and maintained bridges; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
apply for, to accept, and expend any Federal and/or State grants which may be 
available for the aforementioned purposes; and (3) to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other interest(s) as may be necesary 
to effectuate said repairs, by the purchase, by gift, by lease, eminent domain, 
or otherwise. Seconded. This money will pay for Ipswich's share of the Winthrop 
Bridge repairs. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Because of 
eminent domain, a two-thirds vote was necessary; the motion passed on a unanimous 
voice vote. 

ARTICLE 17 

To hear and act upon reports of the committees, and to continue such committees 

as the Town may vote to continue. 

Mrs. Mary Conley moved that the report of the Historic District Study Committee 
be accepted and the Committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Mrs. Dorcas Rice moved that the Commuter Rail Committee report be accepted and 
the Committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Mrs. Vivian Endicott moved that the report of the Hall -Haskell House Committee be 
be accepted and the Committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 18 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, or to transfer from avail- 
able funds or from the Federal General Revenue Sharing Account, a sum of money to 
be placed in the Special Fund for the celebrating of the 350th Anniversary of the 
incorporation of the Town of Ipswich; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Mr. Pszenny moved that the Town vote to transfer from the Federal General Revenue 
Sharing Account the sum of $31,250 to be placed in the Special Fund for the cele- 
brating of the 350th Anniversary of the incorporation of the Town of Ipswich. 
Seconded. The Committee has realized $6,500 from contributions and the sale of 
t-shir'ts, medallions, etc., and hopes to be able to return some money to the Town, 
Chairman of the 350th Committee Joseph Carpenter gave a progress report. Board 
of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 19 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) To amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Ipswich "SECTION X ADMINISTRATION", subsection "H. Special Permits", 
third paragraph, by deleting the same in its entirety and by substituting in lieu 
thereof the following third paragraph: 



-17- 



"Except with respect to the removal of sand, gravel or loam, in accordance with 
the provisions of Section 9 of Chapter 40A of the General Laws, a special permit 
granted under this By-Law shall lapse within two years of the date of approval if 
a substantial use thereof has not sooner commenced except for good cause or in 
the case of permit for construction if construction has not begun by such date 
except for good cause. A special permit granted under this By-Law for the remov- 
al of sand, gravel or loam shall lapse within one year of the date of approval if 
a substantial use thereof has not sooner commenced, except for good cause."; and 
(2) To repeal General By-Laws Chapter XIV, "Section 3. Removal of Earth" in its 
entirety; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board Chairman James Warner moved that the Town vote: (1) To amend the 
Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich "SECTION X ADMINISTRATION", sub- 
section "H. Special Permits", third paragraph, by deleting the same in its 
entirety and by substituting in lieu thereof the following third paragraph: 

"Except with respect to the removal of sand, gravel or loam, in accordance 
with the provisions of Section 9 of Chapter 40A of the General Laws, a special 
permit granted under this By-Law shall lapse within two years of the date of 
approval if a substantial use thereof has not sooner commenced except for good 
cause or in the case of permit for construction if construction has not begun by 
such date except for good cause. A special permit granted under this By-Law for 
the removal of sand, gravel or loam shall lapse within one year of the date of 
approval if a substantial use thereof has not sooner commenced, except for good 
cause."; and (2) To repeal General By-Laws Chapter XIV, "Section 3. Removal of 
Earth" in its entirety. Seconded. The Town Manager explained the motion, stat- 
ing that it will clarify inconsistencies in the By-Law. The Board of Selectmen, 
as the permit-issuing authority, recently adopted stringent gravel removal regu- 
lations. The Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended; Harry Leno urged 
acceptance. Motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 20 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of 

Ipswich 

(a) "SECTION VIII. SIGNS", Subsection "D. Permit and Appeal Process", paragraph 
" 2. Appeal Process .", by deleting the third sentence thereof in its entirety 
so that said paragraph 2 shall read as follows: 

"2. Appeal Process . If the Building Inspector determines that one or more limi- 
tations or requirements specified in Subsection B and/or C of Section VIII 
cannot be met, the Board of Appeals, in the circumstances described in this 
paragraph, may grant by special permit a sign that would otherwise not be 
allowed. The special circumstances may include: Unusual configuration, 
location, or use of a building; the presence on a building of a maximum num- 
ber of signs; a sign size larger than that permitted if it is appropriate 
because of the natural space for a sign on a facade or because of other archi- 
tectural features of a building. Prior to the granting of a special permit, 
the Board of Appeals must find that the sign is consistent with the purpose 
of the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich, as set forth in Sec- 
tion I."; and 

(b) "SECTION VIII. SIGNS", Subsection "B. Sign Requirements.", paragraph " 2. Other 
Districts .", subparagraph "a.", by deleting the first sentence thereof in its 
entirety and by substituting in lieu thereof the following: 

"a. An attached sign parallel to a building shall be limited in sign area to (1) 
one and one-half square feet for each lineal foot of horizontal length of 
facade of the business displaying the sign; (2) three-fourths of the length 
of the business displaying the sign; (3) a projection of no more than twelve 
inches from the face of the building."; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 



-18- 



Planning Board member Mrs. Barbara Ostberg moved that the Town vote to amend the 
the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich 

(a) "SECTION VIII. SIGNS", Subsection "D. Permit and Appeal Process", paragraph 
" 2. Appeal Process .", by deleting the third sentence thereof in its entirety 
so that said paragraph 2 shall read as follows: 

"2. Appeal Process . If the Building Inspector determines that one or more limi- 
tations or requirements specified in Subsection B and/or C of Section VIII 
cannot be met, the Board of Appeals, in the circumstances described in this 
paragraph, may grant by special permit a sign that would otherwise not be 
allowed. The special circumstances may include: Unusual configuration, 
location, or use of a building; the presence on a building of a maximum num- 
ber of signs; a sign size larger than that permitted if it is appropriate 
because of the natural space for a sign on a facade or because of other archi- 
tectural features of a building. Prior to the granting of a special permit, 
the Board of Appeals must find that the sign is consistent with the purpose 
of the Protective Zoning. By-Law of the Town of Ipswich, as set forth in Sec- 
tion I."; and 

(b) "SECTION VIII. SIGNS", Subsection "B. Sign Requirements.", paragraph " 2. Other 
Districts .", subparagraph "a.", by deleting the first sentence thereof in its 
entirety and by substituting in lieu thereof the following: 

"a. An attached sign parallel to a building shall be limited in sign area to (1) 
one and one-half square feet for each lineal foot of horizontal length of 
facade of the business displaying the sign; (2) three-fourths of the length 
of the business displaying the sign; (3) a projection of no more than twelve 
inches from the face of the building.". 

Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous voice 

vote. 

ARTICLE 21 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of 
Ipswich, "SECTION II, APPLICABILITY", by deleting subsection C. thereof in its 
entirety and by substituting in lieu thereof the following subsection: 

"C. Abandonment or Discontinuance. Any non-conforming use of a structure or 
land, which has been abandoned or discontinued for a continuous period of two 
years or more, shall not be re-established, and future use shall conform to this 
By-Law. For purposes of this Section, the abandonment or discontinuance period 
shall not be broken by temporary occupancy except when such temporary occupancy 
is for a period of ninety (90) consecutive days or more."; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Planning Board member Patrick McNally moved for indefinite postponement. Sec- 
onded. The Planning Board needs more time to study the matter of "Discontinu- 
ance". Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 22 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of 
Ipswich, Official Zoning Map, by changing the following described area from the 
Intown Residence (IR) District to the Rural Residence (RRA) District, viz: 

Beginning on Linebrook Road at its intersection with Kimball Avenue; thence 
northeasterly on Kimball Avenue to its intersection with High Street; thence 
southeasterly on High Street to its intersection with Linebrook Road in Lord's 
Square; thence westerly on Linebrook Road to the point of beginning; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Mrs. Ruth Drown moved that the Town vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of 
the Town of Ipswich, Official Zoning Map, by changing the following described 
area from the Intown Residence (IR) District to the Rural Residence (RRA) Dis- 
trict, viz: Beginning on Linebrook Road at its intersection with Kimball Avenue; 



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thence northeasterly on Kimball Avenue to its intersection with High Street; 
thence southeasterly on High Street to its intersection with the Boston and Maine 
Railroad right-of-way; thence southeasterly along the Boston and Maine Railroad 
right-of-way to its intersection with Linebrook Road; thence westerly on Line- 
brook Road to the point of beginning. Seconded. Mrs. Drown stated that her 
neighborhood is a quiet one, with mostly one-family homes; homeowners are con- 
cerned because a developer wishes to build 20 condominium units in the center of 
the described area. Board of Selectmen unanimously supported the article, with 
Mr. Damon stating that it affected all of us. The Board has already denied the 
developer's sewerage plans. Mr. Craft stated that the Finance Committee was four 
against the article, two in favor, two abstentions. Mr. Warner stated the Plan- 
ning Board was against the article, feeling that it was spot zoning and not con- 
sistent with the Zoning By-Law. The Planning Board has not approved or endorsed 
the development mentioned. James Johnson asked why the Board rejected the devel- 
oper's sewerage plan but wants to expand the system in Article 32; Mr. Damon gave 
the Board's viewpoint. Daniel Deren asked if this was legal since there is a pro- 
posal; Mr. Howe replied that the legal notice had been placed before the developer 
submitted his cluster plan. Charles Mercier was concerned about the long-range 
effect with fewer rentals, higher rents. Mrs. Dorman asked if denial of a sewer 
permit would effectively stop the development; Town Counsel replied that it would 
not be possible to put that many units on a small site without sewerage. The 
voice vote was inconclusive; on the hand count, the motion passed 324 in favor, 
99 opposed. 

ARTICLE 23 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of 
Ipswich, Official Zoning Map, by extending the Northwesterly boundary of the 
Intown Residence District from the Southwesterly boundary of land of Winifred 
Wegzyn on Linebrook Road, Northerly to the Northeasterly corner of land now or 
formerly of C.H. Sullivan, thence following said lot line Westerly across School 
Street to a pQint thence following said lot line Westerly across School Street to 
a point 125' West of School Street; thence Southerly following a line parallel to 
and 125' Westerly of School Street to Linebrook Road; thence Easterly along Line- 
brook Road to the point of beginning; or to take any other action relative there- 
to. (By Petition) 

Edward Wegzyn moved that the Town vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of 
the Town, as shown on the "Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich, Mass.", on file 
with the Town Clerk, by relocating a portion of the present boundary line between 
the Intown Residence (IR) District and the Rural Residential A (RRA) District 
from: Its present location beginning at its intersection with Linebrook Road and 
land of Winifred Wegzyn and running in a northeasterly direction to land of said 
Town of Ipswich, a distance of approximately 875 feet, in a northwesterly direc- 
tion approximately 250 feet to School Street, so that the portion of said bound- 
ary line as relocated extends from its present terminus on said Linebrook Road a 
distance of approximately 375 feet northwesterly to the intersection of Linebrook 
Road and School Street, thence running northeasterly by said School Street a dis- 
tance of approximately 875 feet, thence turning and running southeasterly a dis- 
tance of approximately 250 feet to its present intersection with said land of 
Winifred Wegzyn and said Town of Ipswich. Seconded. The Wegzyn family gave land 
to the Town for the High School when it was built, saving several lots for family 
members; now find that the lots do not conform to the Rural Residential District 
and wish to change the district to Intown Residence where they would be conform- 
ing. Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended; Finance Committee, seven in 
favor, one abstained, one not voting; Planning Board, three in favor, two opposed. 
Joe Fenton, Harry Leno spoke in opposition. Lillian North, in answer to a ques- 
tion, said that the Conservation Commission had not been approached regarding the 
matter and could not make a recommendation. The voice vote was inconclusive; on 
the hand count, the motion passed 239 in favor, 118 opposed. 

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ARTICLE 24 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of 
Ipswich, Official Zoning Map, by changing the following described area from the 
Rural Residence (RRA) District to the Industrial (I) District: A certain parcel 
of land located on the Southeasterly side of the Newburyport Turnpike and bounded 
Northwesterly by the said Newburyport Turnpike 742.68 feet; Northeasterly by East 
Street #2, 20 feet; Southeasterly by land now or formerly of Peterson, 201.58 
feet; Northeasterly again by land of said Peterson 204.86 feet; Southeasterly 
again by land of Peterson and land now or formerly of Taylor et al 286.65 feet 
and Southerly by other land of Iovanella et al and being the Town line between 
the Town of Ipswich and Topsfield. Said parcel contains 2.22 acres, more or 
less."; or to take any other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Attorney George Hayes moved that the Town vote to amend the Protective Zoning By- 
Law of the Town of Ipswich, Official Zoning Map, by changing the following de- 
scribed area from the Rural Residence (RRA) District to the Industrial (I) Dis- 
trict: A certain parcel of land located on the Southeasterly side of the Newbury- 
port Turnpike and bounded Northwesterly by the said Newburyport Turnpike 742.68 
feet; Northeasterly by East Street #2, 20 feet; Southeasterly by land now or for- 
merly of Peterson, 201.58 feet; Northeasterly again by land of said Peterson 
204.86 feet; Southeasterly again by land of Peterson and land now or formerly of 
Taylor et al 286.65 feet and Southerly by other land of Iovanella et al and being 
the Town line between the Town of Ipswich and Topsfield. Seconded. This area is 
more suited for an Industrial District, according to Mr. Hayes and the neighbor- 
hood will be protected by a 50' buffer zone. Board of Selectmen recmmended four 
- one; Finance Committee recommended; Planning Board recommended. A non-voting 
resident wished to speak on the matter; it was moved, seconded and so voted that 
she be allowed to do so. Linda Peterson, of East Street #2, wished to see the 
area remain residential, feeling that changing the zoning to Industrial would 
change the character. The voice vote was inconclusive; on the hand count, the 
motion passed 279 in favor, 60 opposed. 

ARTICLE 25 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of 

Ipswich; 

(1) "SECTION III DEFINITIONS", 

(a) by deleting the words "....or occupied " from the definition "DWELLING, 

SINGLE-FAMILY ATTACHED" so that said definition shall read as amended: 

"DWELLING, SINGLE-FAMILY ATTACHED: A building designed as a residence for one 
family and separated from another attached dwelling on one or both sides either 
by a vertical party wall or walls or by a contiguous wall or walls without side 
yards, provided said building sits on its own individual lot with its own front- 
age and which meets the requirements of the Table of Dimensional and Density Reg- 
ulations."; 

(b) by deleting the words " or occupied " from the definition "DWELLING, 

SINGLE-FAMILY DETACHED" so that said definition shall read as amended: 

"DWELLING, SINGLE-FAMILY DETACHED: A building which is designed as a residence 
for one family and is substantially separated by open space from any other struc- 
ture or structures except accessory buildings."; and 

(c) by deleting the definition "DWELLING, MULTI-FAMILY" in its entirety and by 
substituting in lieu thereof the following definition: 

"DWELLING, MULTI-FAMILY: A building designed or occupied as a residence con- 
taining three or more dwelling units which stands on a commonly-owned lot and 
which complies with the Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations."; and 

(d) by adding after COMMUNITY FACILITIES the following definitions thereto: 
"Dwelling: every building or shelter used or intended for human habitation."; 

and 

"Dwelling Unit: the room, or group of rooms, within a dwelling, or any dwell - 



-21- 



ing, used, or intended for use, by a single family or household for common living, 
sleeping, cooking, and eating and sanitary facilities available and regularly 
utilized by all members of such single family or household at all times." and 
(2) "SECTION V USE REGULATIONS", Subsection "D. Table of Use Regulations", 

under the caption "ACCESSORY USE" by changing the words " Private guesthouse 

" to read "....Private non-commercial guesthouse used as a dwelling for less 

less than four (4) months in any calendar year "; or to take any other action 

relative thereto. 

Planning Board member Patrick McNally moved that the Town vote to amend the Pro- 
tective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich; 

(1) "SECTION III DEFINITIONS", 

(a) by adding the words " containing one dwelling unit that is " to the 

definition "DWELLING, SINGLE-FAMILY ATTACHED" so that said definition shall read 
as amended: 

"DWELLING, SINGLE-FAMILY ATTACHED: A building designed or occupied as a resi- 
dence for one family containing one dwelling unit that is separated from another 
attached dwelling on one or both sides either by a vertical party wall or walls 
or by a contiguous wall or walls without side yards, provided said building sits 
on its own individual lot with its own frontage and which meets the requirements 
of the Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations."; 

(b) by adding the words "....containing one dwelling unit that is " to the 

definition "DWELLING, SINGLE-FAMILY DETACHED" so that said definition shall read 
as amended: 

"DWELLING, SINGLE-FAMILY DETACHED: A building which is designed or occupied as 
a residence for one family containing one dwelling unit that is substantially 
separated by open space from any other structure or structures except accessory 
buildings."; and 

(c) by deleting the definition "DWELLING, MULTI-FAMILY" in its entirety and by 
substituting in lieu thereof the following definition: 

"DWELLING, MULTI-FAMILY: A building designed or occupied as a residence con- 
taining three or more dwelling units which stands on a commonly-owned lot and 
which complies with the Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations."; and 

(d) by adding after COMMUNITY FACILITIES the following definitions thereto: 
"Dwelling: e\jery building or shelter used or intended for human habitation."; 

and 

"Dwelling Unit: a single unit providing complete, independent living facili- 
ties for one (1) or more persons including permanent provision for living, sleep- 
ing, eating, cooking, and sanitation." and 

(2) "SECTION V USE REGULATIONS", Subsection "D. Table of Use Regulations", 

under the caption "ACCESSORY USE" by changing the words " Private guesthouse 

" to read " Private non-commercial guesthouse used or occupied as a dwell- 
ing unit ". Seconded. Lawrence Morse moved to amend the motion under Article 

25, (l)(c) to replace the words "three of more dwelling units" in the definition 
of DWELLING, MULTI-FAMILY with the words "two or more dwelling units". Seconded. 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, Planning Board against. Voice vote was 
inconclusive; motion failed on a hand count, 328 to 18. Mr. Warner moved to 
amend the motion by deleting (2) SECTION V USE REGULATIONS. Seconded. Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous voice vote. The main motion, 
as amended, carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 26 

To see if the Town will vote to accept as an approved public way (1) Dix Road; 
(2) that portion of James Road heretofore not accepted; and (3) that portion of 
Edge Street heretofore not accepted; or to take any other action relative there- 
to. (By Petition) 

Mr. Player moved that the Town vote to accept as a public way those unaccepted 
portions of Edge Street, Dix Road and James Road that lie between the present 

-22- 



accepted terminus of Edge Street at #29 and #30 Edge Street and the present 
accepted terminus of James Road at #18 and #21 James Road. Excluded from this 
petition are any portions of Edge Street that lie in a Northerly direction beyond 
the intersection of Dix Road and Edge Street; all as shown in part on "Plan of 
Willowdale Acres, Ipswich, Mass., as-built plans and profiles of James Road, Edge 
Street and Dix Road", consisting of three sheets, as prepared by Raymond Engi- 
neering Service, 240 Cambridge St., Burlington, Mass., dated August 14, 1981. 
Seconded. Board of Selectmen unanimously supported; Finance Committee recom- 
mended as all problems have been corrected. Ronald Noel of Birch Lane stated 
that drainage problems had not been corrected. DPW Director Armand Michaud said 
that the drainage problems had been corrected. Motion carried on unanimous voice 
vote. 

ARTICLE 27 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of 
Ipswich, "SECTION X ADMINISTRATION", subsection "B. Permits, Certificate Required 1 
by adding a third sentence to the first paragraph thereof, viz: 

"The Building Inspector shall issue no building permit on a lot unless said lot 
complies with the provisions of this By-Law and has sufficient frontage in either 
a street which has been constructed to the standards of and has been approved by 
the Planning Board or on an accepted Town street."; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Mr. Warner moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 28 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of 
Ipswich, "SECTION VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS", subsection "E. Screen- 
ing Requirements.", by deleting the same in its entirety and by inserting in lieu 
thereof the following subsection E., viz: 

"E. Screening Requirements. Screening shall be required in the minimum side 
and rear yards of any new wholesale, transportation, industrial, commercial, or 
multi-family use in all districts except the 'Business' district as follows: a 
strip of screening shall be at least ten (10) feet in width, except where such 
use abuts a Rural or Intown Residence district boundary in which case it shall be 
not less than twenty-five (25) feet in width or a greater width not exceeding 
fifty (50) feet if deemed appropriate in the reasonable judgment of the Planning 
Board; such strip shall contain a screen of plantings in its center. The screen 
shall be not less than three (3) feet in height at the time of occupancy of the 
lot and the plantings shall be no more than four (4) feet apart from one another. 
The screen shall thereafter be maintained by the owner or occupants so as to pro- 
vide a dense screen year-round. 

By Special Permit, the Zoning Board of Appeals may approve alternative screening 
or alternative height, setback, or location thereof, unless the primary use is 
subject to Special Permit approval by the Planning Board, in which case said 
Planning Board may approve by Special Permit such alternative screening; the Zon- 
ing Board of Appeals or the Planning Board, as applicable, may consider approval 
of such alternative screening or approval of an alternative height, setback, or 
location thereof only if the applicant submits to said applicable Board a land- 
scape plan for the entire lot prepared by a registered landscape architect. 

An existing natural screen on a lot having a non-conforming use (either principal 
or accessory), shall not be removed by the owner or occupant without a variance 
from the Board of Appeals."; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. McNally moved that the Town vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Ipswich, "SECTION VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS", subsection "E. 



-23- 



Screening Requirements.", by inserting the following two new subparagraphs to the 
end thereof: "By Special Permit, the Zoning Board of Appeals may approve alter- 
native screening or alternative height, setback, or location thereof, unless the 
primary use is subject to Special Permit approval by the Planning Board, in which 
case said Planning Board may approve by Special Permit such alternative screening; 
the Zoning Board of Appeals or the Planning Board, as applicable, may consider 
approval of such alternative screening or approval of an alternative height, set- 
back, or location thereof only if the applicant submits to said applicable Board 
a landscape plan for the entire lot prepared by a registered landscape architect. 

An existing natural screen on a lot having a non-conforming use (either princi- 
pal or accessory), shall not be removed by the owner or occupant without a vari- 
ance from the Board of Appeals." Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Commit- 
tee unanimously recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 29 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under Article 4. of the 
April 05, 1982 Town Meeting by expanding the purpose of the Plumbing and Gas In- 
spection Fee fund to include Planning Board Special Permit Application Fees; or 
to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. LeClair moved that the Town vote to amend its action taken under Article 4. 
of the April 05, 1982 Town Meeting by expanding the purpose of the Plumbing and 
Gas In-spection Fee fund to include Planning Board Application Fees. Seconded. 
This would place application fees for acquifer permits into a revolving fund. 
Board of Selectmen, Planning Board recommended. Finance Committee against. 
Voice vote inconclusive; on the hand count, the motion failed with 125 in favor, 
131 opposed. 

ARTICLE 30 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of monies, for the purchase 
and installation of a new computer system including hardware, software and any 
and all materiel and services incidental thereto; and (2) to determine whether 
said appropriation shall be raised by borrowing, transfer from available funds or 
otherwise; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Player moved that the Town appropriate the sum of $160,000 to purchase and 
install a new computer system including hardware, software and any and all 
materiel and services incidental thereto; and to raise this appropriation, that 
the sum of $160,000 be transferred from Free Cash therefor. Seconded. Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Thomas Emery, Chief 
Brouillette spoke in favor. Motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

It being 11:00 p.m., Mr. Player moved that the Meeting stand adjourned until 
Tuesday, April 03, 1984 at 7:30 p.m. Seconded. Unanimous vote. 

There was no quorum present at 7:30 p.m. on April 3rd and it was moved, seconded 
and voted to adjourn until 7:45 p.m. A quorum was finally reached at 8:00 p.m. 
and the Moderator called the Meeting to order. The final count was 396. 

Tellers appointed were: Thomas Ercoline, Leslie MacLaughlin, Richard Ostberg, 
Ormand Cutler, Robert Sherman, and Melissa Kleiner. 

It was moved, seconded and so voted to allow non-voters in to view the proceed- 
ings. 



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ARTICLE 31 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the pur- 
pose of surveying, designing, constructing, and obtaining related materiel and 
services for an extension of the sanitary sewer system in the area of Green 
Street, Meetinghouse Green, North Main Street and County Street, or any portion 
thereof; to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or 
other interest(s) as may be necesary to effectuate said extensions of the sani- 
tary sewer system by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; to de- 
termine whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing, transfer from 
available funds, or otherwise; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Player moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $22,500 
for the purpose of surveying, designing, constructing, and obtaining related 
materiel and services for an extension of the sanitary sewer system in the area 
of Green Street, Meetinghouse Green, North Main Street and County Street, or any 
portion thereof; to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire such easements 
and/or other interest(s) as may be necesary to effectuate said extensions of the 
sanitary sewer system by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise. 
Seconded. This affects only five properties and the cost will probably be less 
than is being asked for. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously rec- 
ommended. Motion carried on unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 32 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
purpose of surveying, designing, constructing and obtaining related materiel and 
services for an extension of the sanitary sewer system in the area of Newmarch 
Street, Applewood Drive, Arrowhead Trail, Cameron Avenue, Damon Avenue, Jurdin 
Hill Road, and Nabby's Point Road, or any portion thereof, and obtaining all 
materiel and services necessary and incidental thereto; (2) to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other interests as may be 
necessary to effectuate said extension of the sanitary sewer system by purchase, 
gift, lease, eminent domain or otherwise; (3) to determine whether said monies 
shall be raised by borrowing, transfer from available funds, or otherwise; (4) 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept and expend any Federal, 
State, and private grants in conjunction with the aforesaid purposes; and (5) to 
determine if the appropriation, or a portion thereof, shall be raised by bonds, 
or serial notes, or otherwise; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Player moved that the Town vote (1) to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$242,000 for the purpose of surveying, designing, constructing and obtaining re- 
lated materiel and services for an extension of the sanitary sewer system in the 
area of Newmarch Street, Applewood Drive, Arrowhead Trail, Cameron Avenue, Damon 
Avenue, Jurdin Hill Road, and Nabby's Point Road, or any portion thereof, and ob- 
taining all materiel and services necessary and incidental thereto; (2) to auth- 
orize the Board of Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other interests as 
may be necessary to effectuate said extension of the sanitary sewer system by 
purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain or otherwise; (3) to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to apply for, accept and expend any Federal, State, and private grants 
in conjunction with the aforesaid purposes; and (4) to raise this appropriation 
the sum of $30,000 be transferred from the Spring Street/Highland Avenue Sewer 
Construction Account authorized under Article 40 of the April 04, 1983 Annual 
Town Meeting and the sum of $212,000 in Free Cash be transferred, both sums for 
the aforementioned purposes. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee 
unanimously recommended. James Johnson spoke in opposition, as did Jaret Johnson 
(both are residents in the area); Harry Leno spoke in favor. On a two-thirds 
vote, the motion carried with 236 in favor, 91 opposed. 



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ARTICLE 33 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of money in addition to the 
sums raised under Article 24 of the May 02, 1977 Annual Town Meeting and Article 
27 of the May 01, 1978 Annual Town Meeting for remodeling and reconstruction of 
the Town Hall Annex and/or constructing a new addition thereto for a Police Sta- 
tion, and obtaining all materiel and services necessary and incidental thereto; 
(2) to appropriate a sum of money for remodeling, renovations, repairs and recon- 
struction of the Town Hall and obtaining all materiel and services as may be nec- 
essary and incidental thereto; and (3) to determine whether said monies shall be 
raised by borrowing, transfer from available funds, or otherwise, to effectuate 
said purposes; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. George moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum of $522,600 in 
addition to the sums raised under Article 24 of the May 02, 1977 Annual Town 
Meeting and Article 27 of the May 01, 1978 Annual Town Meeting for remodeling and 
reconstruction of the Town Hall Annex for a Police Station, for remodeling and 
reconstructing the Town Hall, and for obtaining all materiel and services neces- 
sary and incidental thereto; and (2) to raise this appropriation the following 
sums be transferred for said purposes: 

Free Cash $520,042 

Account 900-024 2,558 (Town Hall Windows) 

Seconded. Board of Selectmen four - one against the article. Chief Brouillette 
gave the history of the Police Department's search for new quarters, and urged 
acceptance. Finance Committee was five - three in favor. George Mathey, the 
last chairman of the Police Station Study Committee and an architect, urged accep- 
tance, stating that money-wise it was a good bargain; Joseph Carpenter urged 
acceptance. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 34 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to abandon the project to remodel and renovate 
the Town Hall Annex for a police station; and (2) pursuant to the provisions of 
Section 20 of Chapter 44, Massachusetts General Laws, as amended, to change the 
purpose of the appropriations made under Article 41 of the May 02, 1977 Annual 
Town Meeting and under Article 27 of the April 02, 1978 Annual Town Meeting, to 
the extent of the balance of the monies borrowed thereunder from: "remodeling and 
reconstruction of the Town Hall Annex for a Police Station" to "architectural 
services for plans and specifications for an addition to the Town Hall Annex for 
a Police Station, and for constructing such addition and obtaining any and all 
materiel and/or services incidental thereto; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Mr. Player moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 35 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to file special 
legislation to exempt the Town from the provisions of Section 147 of Chapter 140 
of the General Laws, as amended, and further to provide that (a) such portion of 
dog license fees as otherwise would be paid to Essex County be placed in the Gen- 
eral Fund by the Town and (b) such portion of dog license fees as otherwise would 
be retained by the Town Clerk continue to be retained by the Town Clerk; and (c) 
that the licensing year shall be January 01 to December 31 inclusive; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. LeClair moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to file 
special legislation to exempt the Town from the provisions of Section 147 of Chap- 
ter 140 of the General Laws, as amended, and further to provide that (a) such por- 
tion of dog license fees as otherwise would be paid to Essex County be placed in 
the General Fund by the Town and (b) such portion of dog license fees as other- 



-26- 



wise would be retained by the Town Clerk continue to be retained by the Town 
Clerk; and (c) that the licensing year shall be January 01 to December 31 inclu- 
sive. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Mr. Ingram 
asked to amend the motion so that money would go into the upkeep of the Dog Pound 
rather than into the General Fund. Mr. Dalton informed him that couldn't be done; 
Mr. Ingram moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Finance Committee 
against. Failed on voice vote. The main motion carried on unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 36 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) To appropriate a sum of money to engage engi- 
neering services and to acquire any relatpd materiel and/or other services for 
the design, installation, and/or maintenance of drainage systems and structures; 
(2) To authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, to accept and expend any 
Federal and/or State grants which may be available for the aforementioned pur- 
poses,; (3) To authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or 
other interest(s) as may be necessary to effectuate said installation and/or 
maintenance, by purchase, by gift, by lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; and 
(4) To determine whether said appropriation shall be raised by borrowing, trans- 
fer from available funds, or otherwise; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Mr. Pszenny moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum of $87,450 to en- 
gage engineering services and to acquire any related materiel and/or other ser- 
vices for the design, installation, and/or maintenance of drainage systems and 
structures along Kimball Brook from the area of Heard Drive to the confluence of 
Kimball Brook with the Ipswich River; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
apply for, to accept and expend any Federal and/or State grants which may be 
available for the aforementioned purposes; (3) to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to acquire such easements and/or other interest(s) as may be necessary to 
effectuate said installation and/or maintenance, by purchase, by gift, by lease, 
eminent domain, or otherwise in said areas; and (4) to raise said appropriation 
the sum of $87,450 be transferred from the Stabilization Fund. Seconded. Board 
of Selectmen recommended; Finance Committee did not, feeling it was too much 
money; Conservation Commission were three in favor, two opposed, one abstention. 
The motion failed on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 37 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) To appropriate a sum of money to renovate, re- 
construct, and/or undertake extraordinary repairs and to construct an addition to 
the Public Library and to obtain any and all materiel and services incidental 
thereto; (2) To authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept and expend 
any Federal, State and/or private grants in conjunction with the aforesaid pur- 
poses; and (3) To determine whether said appropriation shall be raised by borrow- 
ing, transfer from available funds, or otherwise; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Chairman of the Library Board of Trustees Crocker Snow moved that the Town vote: 
(1) to appropriate the sum of $146,000 to renovate, reconstruct, and/or undertake 
extraordinary repairs and to construct an addition to the Public Library and to 
obtain any and all materiel and services incidental thereto; (2) to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept and expend any Federal, State and/or pri- 
vate grants in conjunction with the aforesaid purposes; and (3) to raise said 
appropriation the sum of $146,000 be transferred from Free Cash. Seconded. 
Boa«rd of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Motion carried on unanimous 
voice vote. 



-27- 



ARTICLE 38 

lo see it the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to survey, design and 
construct a water filtration facility in the area of Dow Brook Reservoir and/or 
Bull Brook Reservoir and to obtain all materiel and services necessary and inci- 
dental thereto; to determine whether said appropriation shall be raised by borrow- 
ing, transfer from available funds, or otherwise; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Water Supply Chairman James Engel moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the 
sum of $5,687,000 to survey, design and construct a water filtration facility and 
appurtenances in the area of Dow Brook Reservoir and Bull Brook Reservoir and to 
obtain all materiel and services necessary and incidental thereto; (2) to author- 
ize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept and expend and State and/or Fed- 
eral grants or private gifts in connection with this project; (3) of the 
$5,687,000 so appropriated, that $313,175 be transferred from Water Surplus and 
$23,825 be raised by taxation; and (4) to raise the balance of this appropriation, 
the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen be authorized to issue 
$5,350,000 in bonds or notes under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Sec- 
tion 8(4), as amended. Seconded. Mr. Engel gave a ^/ery understandable explana- 
tion of why this facility is badly needed in Ipswich. Board of Selectmen, 
Finance Committee enthusiastically and unanimously recommended. Microbiologist 
Joyce Kippin explained the problems with Ipswich water, and urged acceptance. 
James Many was against the article; David Standley, while supporting the article, 
thought the Town should wait to make sure it got a State and/or Federal grant. 
He suggested amending the motion to say that work would not start until a 50% 
State grant was available or the Town at a regular or special town meting voted 
to assume a larger share of the cost. Seconded. The Moderator informed Mr. 
Standley that amendments must be submitted in writing. Mr. Engel stated that his 
committee had based their figures on the assumption of grants, and would have no 
problem with the amendment. Mr. Howe was afraid it might affect the marketabil- 
ity of the bonds. The question was moved and seconded. Mr. Standley withdrew 
his amendment; James Johnson, who had seconded his amendment, reluctantly with- 
drew his second. Question was moved, seconded, carried. Motion carried on a 
voice vote; Mr. Howe requested a hand count. The motion carried with 295 in 
favor, six opposed. 

ARTICLE 39 

To see if the Town will designate as "SALLY'S POND" the standing body of water 

located on South Main Street (behind the Whipple House) in memory of Sarah Lunt 

Weatherall; or take any other action thereto. (By Petition) 

Mrs. Hazel Cleary moved that the Town designate as "SALLY'S POND" the standing 
body of water located on South Main Street (behind the Whipple House) in memory 
of Sarah Lunt Weatherall. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unan- 
imously recommended. Mr. Mathey for the Ipswich Historical Society recommended. 
The voice vote was unanimous. 

ARTICLE 40 

To see what action the Town wishes to take with respect to the issue of Acid Rain. 

Mr. Damon moved that Town Meeting direct the Board of Selectmen to write to our 
state and national legislators, with copies to the President of the United States 
and the Secretary of the Environmental Protection Agency, expressing Ipswich's 
outrage at the dangerous levels of acid rain falling on our Town. The letters 
should urge quick action by the federal government to order power plants to re- 
duce emissions of sulphuric and nitrogen wastes into the atmosphere, which wastes 
combine with oxygen and water to form dangerous sulphuric and nitric acids. The 
letters should emphasize that we are against additional years of research, as pro- 



-28- 



posed by the administration, and demand action now, before our ponds and reser- 
voirs join the list of ponds and reservoirs in the state that have already died 
from absorbing too much acid. Seconded. Board of Selectmen were four - one in 
favor; Finance Committee were six in favor. The question was moved, seconded, 
voted. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 41 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the pur- 
pose of replacing the Veterans' Honor Roll on South Main Street, an equal sum of 
money to be made available for said purpose from the Veterans' Memorial Committee; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Jacob Burridge moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. The Committee to 
replace the Veterans' memorial on South Main Street has reached 80% of its goal. 
Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 42 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to be added 

to the stabilization fund; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Pszenny moved for indefinite postonement. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Mr. Pszenny moved for dissolution of the 351st Annual Town Meeting of the Town of 
Ipswich. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. Meeting dissolved at 10:31 p.m. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting up attested copies thereof 
at the Post Office and at each of the meeting houses in the Town, by publication 
seven days at least prior to the time for holding said meeting, in a newspaper 
published in, or having a general circulation in the Town of Ipswich. 

Given unto our hands this 19th day of March in the year of our Lord, One Thousand 
Nine Hundred and Eighty-Four. 

Town of Ipswich 

Board of Selectmen 

David S. Player, Chairman Lawrence J. Pszenny 

Edwin H. Damon, Jr. William E. Getirge 

Arthur S. LeClair 



-29- 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

David S. Player, Jr., Chairman 

1984 was a very busy and productive year for the Board of Selectmen. The Board 
continued to focus its attentions on the long-range solutions to certain problems 
facing the Town, as well as attending to its day to day duties. 

This past year we have, with the help of the Water Study Committee and especially 
Jim Engel , made continued progress with the planning and development aspects of 
the water filtration facility. 

The rehabilitation of the Town Hall, as well as the transformation of the Annex 
into a Police Station, has been a major undertaking on the part of the Town. The 
results, hopefully, will be increased efficiency of operations and we hope a more 
convenient method for you to transact your business with the Town. It has also 
preserved one of the Town's most cherished landmarks. 

Regrettably, in 1984 Arthur LeClair passed away. A long-time Selectman, Arthur 
brought a unique style to the Board, and I often found his opinions invaluable at 
getting to the heart of a particular issue. The void created by his passing will 
be difficult to fill . 

I would like to thank the Town Manager, Finance Committee and all those who have 
served on various Town Boards and Committees, for their unselfish involvement. 
Without their guidance and input, our service to you would have diminished 
immeasurably. 



TOWN MANAGER 
George E. Howe 

Nineteen eighty-four was a year of planning for major capital expenditures and 
commencing their implementation. At the conclusion of our 350th Anniversary cel- 
ebration, major renovations to the Town Hall commenced and construction of an 
addition to the Library was begun. 

In the area of General Government, plans were finalized for and a new computer 
system was ordered to serve the Town and School Superintendent's Office. A new 
telephone system was installed in the Town Hall. The Town's by-laws and regula- 
tions were being placed on our word processor, our fee schedule was updated, and 
our Town capital plan was revised. In October a Handicapped Self-evaluation 
Study Committee was formed, charged with developing amendments to our service 
delivery systems to eliminate barriers to the handicapped. 

Much attention was given code enforcement. New gravel regulations were drafted 
and adopted by the Selectmen. A comprehensive review of the subdivision regula- 
tions was completed, resulting in over fifteen amendments, and a department head 
team process was implemented to review the many applications being presented to 
the Planning Board. Peter Gray joined the Town staff as Health Agent. 

The Public Works Department also undertook several capital projects this past 
year: repairs to the highway garage, construction repairs to the Mill Road 
bridge, design of a replacement bridge over Fox Creek on Argil la Road, extensions 
of sewers on Spring Street and Highland Avenue and designs for sewers in the 
Newmarch Street neighborhood, and commencement of detailed plans and specifica- 
tions for a new water filtration plant. 

-30- 



Renovations of the Town Hall Annex for a Police Station are the most notable 
activity in public safety. The Fire Department enforced smoke detector regula- 
tions, implemented the right-to-know law relative to hazardous materials, under- 
took a basic training course for its regular force, repaired Engine 1 and up- 
graded its mutual aid radio communications. 

Perhaps the most profound change this past year in the Manager's Office has been 
the October retirement of Constance Chisholm, long time secretary to the Town 
Manager. Connie really ran the office. We miss her! 



ASSESSOR'S OFFICE 

Frank J. Ragonese, Chief Assessor 

The total valuation of the Town .January 01, 1984, was $309,858,810 representing 
an increase of $9,152,360 over the previous year. 

The total valuation of the Town by classification is: 

Class 1 Residential $266,969,620 
Class 2 Open Space 

Class 3 Commercial 31,573,290 
Class 4 Industrial 6,242,150 
Personal Property 5,073,750 

The Tax Rate of $19.25 for Fiscal Year 1985 remained the same as the Fiscal Year 
1984. 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Charles W. Turner, Jr. 

The following is a synopsis of the building construction in 1984: 



RESIDENTIAL 



Number of Dwelling Units 
Additions/Alterations to Dwelling Units 
Structures Other than Dwelling Units 

(includes Pools, In/Above Ground) 
Manufactured Items 



COMMERCIAL 



Number of Commercial Units 
Additions/Alterations to Commercial Units 
Manufactured Items 



AMOUNT 


ESTIMATED COST 


55 
199 


$3,388,000* 
1,712,802 


108 
67 


667,642 
58,974 


11 
42 
52 


587,000 

1,586,050 

89,535 



TOTALS 



Number of Permits Issued 
Permit Fees Collected 
Estimated Construction Costs 



519 



23,535 
8,090,003 



PLUMBING AND GAS 

PI umbing 

Gas 



AMOUNT 
145 
113 



FEES 

$4,625 

2,486 



TOTALS 



Number of Permits Issued 
Permit Fees Collected 



258 



7,111 



-31- 



*The cost of nine (9) of the fifty-five (55) units is reflected in Additions/ 
Alterations to Dwelling Units. 



CEMETERIES, PARKS AND BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 
James E. Graffum, Director 

Grounds work was performed in all of the Town's nine Cemeteries and its eight 
Parks and Playgrounds. A new four grave section was mapped out for future use 
in the New Highland Cemetery, and a new two grave section was opened in the New 
Linebrook Cemetery. 

The Cemetery and Parks Department also assisted in working with the Town's 350th 
Committee in making the summer-long celebration the success it was. 

We also regraded and landscaped the area around the Town's new War Memorial. 

There were 119 Interments in 1984. There were two-four grave, seven-two grave, 
and two-single grave lots awarded to Veterans. Five-four grave, five-two grave, 
nine-singles, and two-eight grave lots were sold. 

Also, there were seventeen Government Markers set, twenty-eight Corner Post sets 
installed, twenty-one Monument Foundations poured, and forty-four Markers set. 

Chapel Tent Rentals $ 1,140 

Sale of Lots 2,050 

Foundations 2,901 

Perpetual Care 3,075 

Interment Openings 12,790 = $21,956 

****** 

CIVIL DEFENSE 

David R. Clements, Director 

Upon completion of my first full year as Director of Civil Defense, I have seen a 
major change in the overall program of the Civil Defense Agency in the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts. 

We are now responsible for carrying out programs instituted by the Massachusetts 
Civil Defense Agency. We are also preparing ourselves to be of assistance to the 
local community in case of natural disaster or a major accident. In any such 
case, we will be of help to the Town, working along with the Town Manager and 
the Police and Fire Chiefs. 

On February 03, 1984, John T. Clogston was appointed as Deputy Director. Together 
we have attended monthly meetings in conjunction with the North Shore Civil 
Defense Council of which Ipswich is a member. These meetings are held in differ- 
ent host communities on the North Shore. We also attend monthly meetings in 
Tewksbury which are presided over by Area I State Director Frank Belitsky. There 
are five areas in Massachusetts; Ipswich being in Area I. At these meetings we 
are constantly updated with new material and programs of the Massachusetts 
Department of Civil Defense. These meetings are held in the evening for our con- 
venience and are both informative and beneficial to our department. 

The Auxiliary Police Department continues to train extensively in C.P.R. and the 
First Responders' Course in First Aid. They have also qualified in the fire arms 
program which is an annual requirement. As part of their ongoing training, they 



-32^ 



have accomplished 1,200 hours of service this year to the Town by working week- 
ends with the regular Police Department but in a voluntary capacity. 

February 1984 saw this Department actively searching for a downed airplane in the 
woods in Beverly. We worked with the North Shore Civil Defense Council. There 
were eight auxiliary members and this director searching for a total of fourteen 
hours but the plane was never found. 

The newest group to be formed as part of this Department is a Radiological Moni- 
toring Department. There are currently four members and they are working \jery 
hard to organize. 

Upon the invitation of the New Hampshire Public Service Department, three members 
of Ipswich's Civil Defense attended a day-long seminar at the Seabrook Nuclear 
Power Plant. This was found to be \/ery informative and educational. The trip 
helped us to understand some of the problems facing a Nuclear Power Plant and its 
surrounding communities. 

I'd like to thank all the Department Heads for their help and cooperation in this 
past year; you have certainly made my job a little easier. 

****** 

COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 
Dorcas Rice, Chairman 

The good news for 1984 was wonderful; the bad news was awful! 

First, the good news! On April 30th the Committee realized the fruition of their 
1983 letter of inquiry to Sylvania concerning the vacant lot across from the 
depot. On that day the purchase agreement between Sylvania and the Town was 
signed, thus providing a convenient and much-needed parking lot for commuters. 
By June it was ready for use, and by September usage was heavy. 

Another bright spot locally was the MBTA's funding through CATA for station 
beautif ication, which took the form of flower tubs along the station area. These 
were beautifully planted by Bill Grant of Southside Greenhouse and cared for by 
Committee members and friends; water was supplied by Pechilis' Liquor Mart. The 
tubs elicited much praise and pleasure from everyone, and it is hoped the funding 
will continue. 

Now for the bad news! In January a fire lasting several days destroyed the North 
Station area railroad bridges and pilings, necessitating the closing of North 
Station. However, the T responded swiftly to the emergency and created a tempo- 
rary "station" at Sullivan Square for Eastern Line riders; a solution many riders 
have found more convenient than North Station! Bridge reconstruction has pro- 
gressed ahead of schedule, and North Station will be reopened in April or May, 
1985. 

In November another disastrous fire occurred in Beverly; wiping out the railroad 
bridge across the harbor and creating havoc and chaos for North Shore commuters, 
with trains unable to run beyond Salem. The T responded with emergency busing to 
and from North Street in Salem; however, the remaining weeks of 1984 commuting 
could best be described as a new adventure e^/ery day. Reconstuction of this 
bridge is expected to be finished by October, 1985. 

With regard to both of these fires, especially the Beverly one, the Committee has 
been busy attending local and area meetings and monitoring service. We commend 



-33- 



the MBTA in both instances for swiftly initiating emergency plans. They have 
done a good job under horrendous circumstances, and it is to their great credit 
that there was no interruption of service either time. 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
Lillian V. North, Chairman 

The Ipswich Conservation Commission is a non-paid, seven-member official Town 
body with associate membership. Commission members are appointed by the Town 
Manager and confirmed by the Board of Selectmen for a period of three years. The 
Commission meets bi-weekly and conducts an average of three to four on-site in- 
spections per month, plus the monitoring of on-going projects. 

Hundreds of acres of wetlands along the Eastern seacoast are lost each year, wet- 
lands which are the beginning of the food chain, necessary to the lowest forms of 
life and continuing on up to all forms of animals and ultimately, to man himself. 
The Commission is specifically charged with the responsibility of protecting the 
Town of Ipswich's natural resources in the inland fresh waters and coastal salt 
waters regions. 

In 1984, 13 Notices of Intent were received and 12 Orders of Conditions were 
issued. Two Determinations of Applicability were received and two Certificates 
of Compliance were issued. 

In 1984, liaison between the Building Inspector, Health Agent, Planning Board, 
Department of Public Works and the Town Manager has resulted in an efficient, 
albeit yet to be improved upon, system of checks and counter-checks. This has 
served to provide more public awareness which has led to more notifications prior 
to the commencement of projects and hence, fewer violations of the Wetlands Pro- 
tection Act. 

The Commission also began, toward the latter part of 1984, the process of updat- 
ing the Open Space Plan in anticipation of acquiriing additional parcels of land 
which will be to the benefit and enjoyment of the general public. 

The Conservation Commission is a dedicated group and all members have spent many 
hours of their time working in behalf of preserving the wetlands of Ipswich. 



DOG AND ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 
Harry W. Leno, Jr. 

This past year many new improvements have been made to upgrade the existing con- 
ditions at the pound. These improvements include six new dog runs and the in- 
stallation of six new outdoor enclosures. 

The Ipswich Humane Group has continued its strong effort in insuring the contin- 
ued success of the pet adoption service. This group, through its dedication and 
loyalty, have made the lives of all incarcerated animals a little more humane. A 
sincere thank you is in order for all those who unselfishly volunteered their 
effort and time. Their column established in the newspaper has been an on-going 
informative source to enlighten the public about the various issued concerning 
the responsibility of domesticated pets as well as wildlife. 

During 1984 there were: Complaints Received 2,860 

Complaints Investigated 2,745 

-34- 



Dog Bites 32 

Animals Killed By Dogs 19 

Animals Killed By Cars 126 

Dogs Picked Up 241 

Animals Found 281 

Dogs Disposed Of 3 

Dogs Returned To Owners 233 

Cat Complaints 403 

Citations Issued 232 

Patrol Hours 1,610 

Licenses 1,238 

Dogs Adopted 42 

Cats Adopted 26 



FAIR HOUSING COMMITTEE 
Natalie L. Gaynor, Chairman 

The Fair Housing Committee formed three sub-committees to explore issues relevant 
to the welfare of the citizens of Ipswich and the Town itself. The three sub- 
committees are as follows: Equal Access to Housing, Sub-Standard Housing, and 
Housing Availabil ity. 

The Equal Access to Housing Sub-Committee worked closely with an Ipswich resi- 
dent, who had filed a complaint against the Ipswich Housing Authority charging 
racial discrimination in housing. The resident subsequently conferred with the 
Fair Housing Committee in her search for housing in Ipswich. Through the efforts 
of the Fair Housing Committee and the Housing Availability Sub-Committee, housing 
was found for the resident and she was able to move from her one room shanty to a 
well -maintained two bedroom apartment in Ipswich. The sub-committee worked six 
months towards this endavor. Subsequently, the complaint was dismissed by MCAD 
and the resident, because of the efforts of the Fair Housing Committee, did not 
appeal that decision. 

The Sub-Standard Housing Sub-Committee has worked diligently in the area of sub- 
standard housing by investigating complaints from local tenants. The FHS re- 
ceived a complaint from a tenant who is receiving a rental subsidy from the IHA. 
The complaint was initiated at the IHA, but due to communication problems, the 
tenant called the FHC. The complaints ranged from gas fumes to frozen inner 
walls. The FHC notified the IHA to have the Health Department inspect said 
dwelling and report the results. 

The Fair Housing Committee will handle, on an individual basis, complaints from 
the public. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Edwin R. Emerson, Chief 

The year of 1984 saw the opening of Linebrook Fire Station in June. The Line- 
brook Steering Committee purchased a 750 gallon pumper from the Byfield Fire 
Department and then donated it to the Town. The pumper is now designated Engine 
5. Ladder 2 and Engine 5 are stationed at Linebrook. 

Engine 1 (1966 Mack pumper) had been refurbished and equipped with a hydraulic 
hose reel for 4" hose. This truck is now equipped with three preconnected attack 
lines and a new 750-qallon water tank. 

-35- 



Training has been ongoing for the Department's 16 permanent men and 36 call men. 
Training manuals were provided to each man. For the first time, two men attended 
and graduated the seven week intensive firefighting course at the Massachusetts 
Firefighting Academy in Sudbury. 

The Fire Department responded to 566 alarms in 1984 (470 still and 96 bell). An 
indicator of the increased load for inspections by the Fire Department is the 55% 
increase over 1983 of the fees raised for permits and inspections ($4,464). New 
construction, remodeling of existing structures, and sale of dwelling units re- 
quire Fire Department inspection. 

A goal of the Department is to increase our fire safety inspection program. A 
firefighter would visit each commercial establishment twice rather than the pres- 
ent once annually. Hopefully, we can continue to send men to the Firefighting 
Academy and offer advanced training. 



GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 
Connie Surpitski, Chairman 

The Government Study Committee had one of its lightest business years in recent 
history. 

We spent a brief amount of time reviewing the Town Manager's Capital Project 
Report. It was agreed to review it further at a subsequent meeting with emphasis 
on: (a) Comments on the plan in general, (b) Recommended changes in form of pre- 
sentation, (c) How could the plan best be utilized? 

We met with the Board of Selectmen who asked us to again look at the issue of re- 
ducing the quorum needed for a Town Meeting. This issue remains under review. 

We continued our endeavors at proofreading the Town Charter and By-Laws. A third 
reading of the updating of this document is currently underway. 



HALL-HASKELL HOUSE COMMITTEE 
Vivian Endicott, Chairman 

During 1984 our Committee has been granted $5,000 from the Alice P. Chase Trust 
of the Boston Safe Deposit and Trust Company. Also, through our requests for 
further support from people of Ipswich, we have received $3,983; gifts ranging 
from $2 to $500. 

The Committee is committed to its job of restoring the Hall -Haskell House, and 
is eager to get all the programs planned for the Little Red House under way. 

**•*•* 

HARBORMASTER 
Michael Holland 

Ipswich residents have the beauty and the enjoyment of the Town's extensive 
waterways. But there is also the responsibility to preserve them and to protect 
the people using them. Ipswich has made a commitment to its Waterways' program; 
progress is steady. 



-36- 



The primary focus of the Harbormaster was to increase revenues for a more work- 
able budget. To accomplish this end, a mooring process was started which is 
proving successful. The mooring services are requiring the largest expenditures 
of monies from the budget. To enable the Harbormaster's budget to keep pace with 
the amount of money necessary to accomplish other programs, a Mooring Processing 
Fee was recommended. A thank you to the IBYC Commodore Dave Gosse for his assis- 
tance this season. 

A police officer was paid from the budget to patrol the Town Landing on summer 

Sundays. This controlled the many problems which had been developing with the 

increased use of the ramp and left more time for the Harbormaster to be on the 
water. 

Increased cooperation with the Coast Guard was a primary task. A special thank 
you from both the Habormaster and the Coast Guard to Ralph Hebert and Herm 
Melanson for their time and assistance. 

A new type of marker was installed on a limited basis and proved to be a valuable 
navigational aid at Eagle Hill. 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts has been contacted for ramp repairs, the Corps 
of Engineers has been contacted for dredging the river, and the Coast Guard has 
been contacted for spindles and markers. 

The floats at the Town Landing were either repaired or discarded and a replace- 
ment program has been initiated. To defray the expenses at the Town Landing, a 
launching fee was recommended to the Waterways Committee. 

The largest and most important duty, Safety Patrol, was most severely hampered by 
lack of a proper boat. A thank you to the Fire Department for their assistance 
in emergencies. 

Use of the Ipswich Waterways is growing at an unprecedented rate. While the Town 
received upwards of twenty hours of just Safety Patrol each week, it was not 
enough to be effective. 

I have been elected Vice-President of the Harbormaster's Association for the 
second year. Ipswich's progress is being watched and complimented. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 
Peter J. Gray, Agent 

1984 has been a year of change for the Board of Health. Joseph Giancola, who 
served the Health Department as Agent for four years, left in May. In November 
the Department moved into the new offices, and we feel we will have better com- 
munications with other departments. 

Areas of enforcement include: Public Health codes, Sanitation, Septic and Trash 
Route inspections. 

The trash collection contract being administered has been pleasantly devoid of 
major complaints. 

The Solid Waste Transfer Station has been operated wery capably by Gerry 
Blaisdell. Many Townspeople are unaware of the existence of the Solid Waste 
Transfer Station on Town Farm Road. 



-37- 



Various clinics have been conducted. Approximately 400 doses of Flu vaccine were 
administered in October. Our thanks to Violet Demille, R.N. for running these 
clinics. The biological s/vaccines depot has been maintained for physicians. 

Permits issued for 1984: 64 Disposal Works Permits, 60 Food Sales and Service 
Permits and 16 Disposal Works Installers Permits. 

The Board of Health meets on the first Monday evening of each month with addi- 
tional meetings as needed. 

The Sealer of Weights and Measures performs numerous functions as required by the 
National Bureau of Standards, directed by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce; the Gen- 
eral Laws of Massachusetts as related to Weights and Measures and the rules and 
regulations of the State Division of Standards, now called the Division of Con- 
sumer Affairs and the Town of Ipswich ordinances. Administrative, clerk and 
laboratory functions were performed at various industrial, commercial plants, 
stores and drug stores in the Town of Ipswich. 

The following is a synopsis of work performed by Normand J. Bedard, Sealer of 
Weights and Measures during 1984: 

Scales and balances, adjusted, tested and sealed 66 
Avoirdupois weights; Apothecary, Troy and Metric Weights tested and sealed 79 

Scales condemned by the State Bureau of Standards 2 

Scales and balances not sealed 5 

Gasoline pumps tested and sealed 71 

Gasoline pumps adjusted before sealing 1 

Gasoline pumps tested and not sealed 1 

Oil truck meters tested and sealed 9 

Oil truck meters tested and adjusted before sealing 2 

Warnings issued to oil truck drivers for broken seals, in transit 2 

Leather measuring machine tested and sealed 1 

Complaints from Ipswich residents concering wood shortages (stove wood) 2 

Number of breads reweighed and checked for correct weight 35 

Number of breads reweighed and found incorrect 5 

Number of oil trucks inspected for heating oil while in transit 9 

Meats reweighed for correct weight and price 35 

Meats reweighed and found incorrect 6 

Turkeys and poultry reweighed for correct weight and price 60 

Turkeys and poultry reweighed and found incorrect, then repriced 14 

Drug store balances tested and sealed 3 

Drug store weights; apothecary, troy and metric tested and sealed 79 

Platform scales, over 10,000 lbs. inspected by State Bureau Division 3 

Platform scales, over 10,000 lbs. condemned by State Bureau Division 2 

Platform scales, over 10,000 lbs. to be retested, repaired, then sealed 3 

Sealing fees received and paid to the Town Treasurer: $1,212.00 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
Mary P. Conley, Chairman 

The Historical Commission during the 1984 year applied many of its efforts toward 
assisting the Town with the celebration of its 350th Anniversary. Two members of 
the Commission, Alice Keenan and Mary Conley, became members of the Anniversary 
Committee, and, in that capacity and with the participation of Elizabeth Newton 
of the Ipswich Historical Society, researched, wrote and published a brief his- 
tory of the Town's 350 years. 



-38- 



The Commission also assisted the Historical Society with the events which the 
Society was sponsoring as part of the Anniversary celebration, especially the 
burying of the Time Capsule on August 4th. 

Ruthann Rogers of the Commission planned and arranged an exhibition of handsome 
photographs of interesting old Ipswich houses, the work of several local photog- 
raphers. The exhibition was on display in the windows of the Essex County Gas 
Company and drew an appreciative audience during and after the 350th Anniversary 
events. 

Barbara Emberly of the Commission was responsible for distributing copies of 
"Something to Preserve" to local stores and handling the finances of the sales. 

In the late fall as the Town Hall was undergoing renovation, the Commission be- 
came concerned about the safety and security of the Town Records, and voted to 
have a consultant from the Northeast Document Center study the situation and re- 
port on the Records' condition .and the Town's plans for future storage. The 
Commission made that report and its recommendations available to the Town Clerk 
and the Town Manager. 

In line with its concern for the preservation of the Town's oldest houses, the 
Commission was pleased to know that the old Conant House on Linebrook Road was 
finally saved from demolition through the efforts of a concerned realtor, a sav- 
ings institution and a young man who took on the difficult task of restoration. 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Lei and Schoen, Chairman 

The Ipswich Housing Authority was organized under Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 121-B and provides safe, decent and sanitary housing with many ancillary 
services for 338 households of approximately 670 residents through the following 
projects: 

Agawam Village Elderly Project 667-4, was built in 1979 and contains 80 apart- 
ments, eight of which are designed for wheelchair maneuverability. These are all 
electric apartments, and tenants pay 25% of their adjusted gross income for rent 
including utilities. The development includes such amenities as laundry rooms, a 
dining-recreation hall, and a small multi-purpose building with a greenhouse 
attachment. 

Agawam Village Family Project 705-1, also built in 1979 contains 14 apartments 
for low-income families as follows: two-four bedroom units, eight-three bedroom 
units, and four-two bedroom units. These units have all electric utilities, full 
basements, and individual yard areas. Tenants pay 25% of their adjusted gross 
income for rent including utilities. 

Southern Heights Veteran's Project 200-1, was built in 1950. It consists of two- 
four bedroom apartments, eight-three bedroom apartments, and 14-two bedroom 
apartments. Veterans have priority for these units. However, a non-veteran 
family may be housed here if there is no qualifying veteran on the list or an 
emergency situation arises. Tenants pay 17% of their adjusted income for shelter 
rent and pay their own utilities. 

Southern Manor Project 667-C-2, was built in 1957 and consist of 20-one bedroom 
apartments for the elderly. Tenants here can share in the amenities provided at 
the adjacent Agawam Village. Rents are based on 25% of a tenant's adjusted gross 
income and includes all utilities. 

-39- 



Whittier Park Project 667-C2, was built in 1968. In consists of 100-one bedroom 
units for elderly or handicapped tenants located on Caroline Avenue. The facili- 
ties provided at this location include a T.V. room, library, recreation-dining 
hall and laundry room. Tenants pay 25% of their adjusted gross income for rent 
which includes all utilities. 

There are two Rental Assistance Programs administered by the Housing Authority 

which are: 

Chapter 70 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth help subsidize 85 low-income 
families and individuals who live in privately-owned apartments while paying 
25% of their net income for rent and utilities. The Authority makes up the 
difference between that amount and the agreed upon rent for the unit. This is 
a state program. 

In Section 8 there are an additional 15 units of federally subsidized housing 
provided through the Housing Act of 1949 as amended. These are administered 
similarly to the State's program except that tenants pay up to 30% of their 
adjusted income for rent. Apartments under this program may be leased in cer- 
tain participating communities outside of Ipswich. 

Congregate lunch programs are available for the elderly at both Whittier Park and 
Agawam Village five days per week. Meals on wheels are also distributed out of 
the Agawam Village kitchen for our handicapped tenants as well as those house- 
bound in town. This past summer the Authority also conducted a successful summer 
recreation program for resident children. A mini-bus is provided to all elderly 
tenants for scheduled routes including three shopping trips per week. 

Our office at One Agawam Village is open from 8:00 a.m. till 4:00 p.m. on week- 
days and a 24 hour emergency maintenance response system is available at all 
times. 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 
Paul R. Beswick, Chairman 

The Industrial Development Commission throughout the past few years has curtailed 
its activities substantially. The 1981 Town Meeting did not vote to furnish the 
necessary finance to develop the proposed Industrial Park off High Street at 
Mitchell Road. Accordingly, the Commission today limits its role to furnishing 
reference information for companies wishing to locate in Ipswich and attending 
seminars such as those sponsored by the Commonwealth on matters of Industrial 
Development. 

The past few years has also seen industrial expansion and growth along the Route 
1 portion of Ipswich. As property in this area becomes further developed, more 
expansion and growth is expected. 

The Commission will continue its function relative to attracting and developing 
light, non-polluting industry to not only the Indsutrail Park site, but to other 
appropriate locations within the town as well. In these endeavors eyery effort 
is also made to maintain the character, historical significance and tradition of 
this Historic Town. 

■k-k-k-k-k-k 



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IPSWICH ARTS COUNCIL 
Helen L. Eames, Chairman 

The Ipswich Arts Council met twice this year to hear the cases of applicants for 
grants. The applicants were advised of the Committee's procedure: adherence to 
the guidelines of the Massachusetts Arts Lottery Council. 

After the applicants' presentations, the Committee determined which applicants 
were eligible, and what part of an individual request could be granted. 

**•*•• 

LIBRARY 

Eleanor M. Gaunt, Librarian 

During 1984, the use of the library increased by nearly 2,000 individual visits 
over last year for a total of 31,230. Similarly, use of reference materials in- 
creased by 1,300 to a high of 17,765 inquiries, suggesting greater use of mater- 
ials within the library building. 

Total circulation of books, records, cassettes, magazines and pamphlets was 82,905 
in 286 days open; an average of 7.2 items per capita. Over 500 new library cards 
were issued, and we borrowed 250 books from other libraries for the use of 
Ipswich people; 50 16 mm. films, and loaned out 95 books to other libraries. 

The library began purchasing cassettes of popular music and some famous works of 
fiction for use both in the home and automobile; 2,549 new books were added, 
bringing the total number of volumes in the library to 65,878, and we added 139 
new recordings. 

"Public Apple", a He system with printer, was installed in December permitting 
parents and other adults to join in the computer literacy of the time and share 
in the knowledge many of their children are acquiring in their schools. Availa- 
bility of word-processing and spreadsheet software was a consideration in making 
the system attractive to local business and professional people. 

A complete inventory of the library's book collection was caried out in May; a 
task which had not been done in 20 years. Its purpose was to bring outdated 
records up to date and permit analysis of unlocated materials. 

The Children's Room held three story hours each week for children 2i-5 years of 
age. They were very well attended, with about 20 children in each group. Older 
children enjoyed special programs, such as checkers competitions and Dungeon and 
Dragons Club. During the summer there were three separate reading groups: "Read- 
ing Rainbow", "Go for the Gold", and "Hats off to Ipswich". 

The Friends of the Public Library deserve a special vote of thanks, not only for 
undertaking a most successful fund drive, but for their ongoing suport of library 
programs. Boston-based author Padraig 0'Malley spoke to a large audience on the 
subject of Northern Ireland and for the children, a series of four Walt Disney 
films was provided. 

The number of active volunteers has grown to eight, who, in all, devote 20 hours 
of their time per week to helping out in many areas of the library's operations, 
including mending of books, and preparation of materials for circulation. Their 
efforts are greatly appreciated. 

For its contribution to Ipswich's 350th Celebration, the library undertook a pub- 
lication project in collaboration with the Education Committee of the Ipswich 



-41- 



Woman's Club. The "Panorama of Old Ipswich" is a pictorial record of the Town's 
history as seen through old postcards. 

In conclusion, we'd like to remind you that your library is more than a book col- 
lection—it's your information place too, so call or visit YOUR library in 1985 
and see what's new for you! 

Library Trustees' Report 
Crocker Snow, Chairman 

With the strong support of the Town Manager, the Selectmen and the Finance Com- 
mittee, the 1984 Town Meeting unanimously voted an appropriation for a much- 
needed library addition. 

The end result; the first major improvement in forty years will be a 50% increase 
in the Children's Library space, and a separate, secure, climate-controlled 
archival area for the Town's historical and genealogical collections. 

The new construction was essentially completed in December 1984. It remains un- 
furnished due to lack of funds. Faced with waiting for the 1985 Town Meeting, 
and a further delay of six months, the Trustees enlisted the Friends of the 
Library in a fundraiser to "Finish and Furnish the Job". 

With great cooperation from the generous people and businesses of Ipswich, the 
fund-raiser went over the top, the furniture and fixtures were ordered by the 
Friends, and the enlarged and improved library should be open for business about 
April 01, 1985. 



PLANNING BOARD 

Barbara F. Ostberg, Chairman 

The Planning Board had a very active year in 1984. It initiated several Zoning 
By-Law amendments in reference to Definitions, Screening Requirements, and Signs; 
and after considerable input from citizens and the Town Manager and his staff 
amended both the Rules and Regulations Governing Subdivisions and Rules and Regu- 
lations Governing the Granting of Special Permits. The latter allows the Plan- 
ning Board to better monitor the new Aquifer Protection By-Law. 

A major portion of the Board's time was spent responding to Special Permit Appli- 
cations; most notably a request for multi -family units off Kimball Avenue and for 
a golf /country club on some 350 plus acres off Route 1. On this latter project, 
the Board worked closely with the Water Supply Committee to ensure the proper pro- 
tection of the Water District. 

The Board has also responded to several Preliminary Plans for subdivisions and 
these plus the press of routine business including numerous weekend site visits 
and the consequent lack of time for study of long range issues, persuaded the 
Board to create the Advisory Committee to the Planning Board. This group, com- 
posed of members from other Town Boards and interested citizens, has been active 
since June. Among its achievements is a comprehensive study of the underutilized 
lots in the IR and B Districts and the potential for multi-family units. The 
present chairman is William Bingham. 

Communication with other Town Boards is greatly simplified by the new office 
location in Town Hall. The Planning Board is particularly pleased with its excel- 
lent working arrangement with the Town Manager and his staff on review of Plans. 
Their input has been extremely helpful. 

-42- 



Membership on the Planning Board has remained stable which greatly facilitates 
the Board's ability to respond to its multitudinous responsibilities. It was, 
however, with great regret that the Board received the resignation of Jean Dauer, 
secretary to the Planning Board for the past six years. 

The population of Ipswich now stands at 11,519. 83 occupancy permits were 
granted in 1984 for new dwelling units; more than double the number granted in 
1983. This spurt in growth, plus the building proposals that await action, pre- 
sent the people of Ipswich and the Planning Board as their respresentati ves with 
a challenge if Ipswich is to maintain its small town character and open space. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Armand R. Brouillette, Chief 

The Police Department answered a total of 9,394 complaints during the calendar 
year 1984 and made 513 arrests for various criminal violations. There were 490 
summonses served and 625 non-crminal motor vehicle citations issued. We also 
ticketed 919 motor vehicles for parking violations. 



A breakdown of some of the statistics are as follows 



Breaking & Entering 76 

Larcenies 159 

Stolen Motor Vehicles 18 

Stolen Boats & Motors 20 

Domestic Complaints 86 
Commitment to State Hospitals 13 

Missing Persons 37 

Assaults and Threats 214 

Accidents 585 



Businesses Found Open 
Sudden Deaths 
Recovered Motor Vehicles 
Recovered Boats/Motors 
Vandal ism 

Protective Custody 
Accidents With Injury 
Accident Fatalities 



225 

18 

27 

4 

325 

65 

78 

2 



As you can see, we have failed to reduce accidents and injuries from last year. 
We will continue to strictly enforce moving motor vehicle violations to lower 
these statistics. 

The Police Department is staffed with 21 police officers and one clerk. We have 
asked the Town to increase the staff by one police officer. 

We expect to move into our newly-renovated building on Elm Street in the early 
soring of 1985. 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 
Armand T. Michaud, Director 

The Public Works Department coordinates the activities of the following divisions 
Public Works Administration, Highway, Forestry, Equipment Maintenance, Town Hall/ 
Annex and Municipal Garage Building Maintenance and Snow and Ice Control. Each 
divi'sion is charged with particular responsibilities relating to its duties. 
When additional manpower is required to perform specific tasks, personnel are 
interchanged within the divisions. 

Below is a summary of the work completed by each of the Public Works Divisions. 



-43- 



Snow and Ice Control 

The Public Works Divisions combine their work forces during the winter months. 
Work consists of plowing roads, hauling snow, sanding, salting roadways, filling 
sand barrels, cleaning catchbasins, clearing snow away from hydrants and answer- 
ing miscellaneous complaints. Other personnel assisting the Public Works crews 
during the height of the snow storms were from the Cemetery and Water Departments 
Also utilized were the services of ten private contractors. 

Equipment Maintenance Division 
Robert Hetnar, Diesel Mechanic 

All Public Works vehicles are serviced and repaired at the Municipal Garage. At 
present there are 30 pieces of motorized equipment that must be kept in good oper. 
ating condition to insure its availability when needed. Operation cost records 
showing maintenance and gas/oil expenses on each vehicle can be obtained from the 
Public Works Administration Office in the Town Hall. Also, minor repairs and 
general servicing is done to the Police cars. 

Repairs were made to the north end wall and part of the rear wall of the Munici- 
pal Garage and a new 10,000 gallon gasoline tank was put in the ground replacing 
two older tanks (one that had started to leak). 

Building Maintenance Division 

Joseph Reilly, Custodian 

Routine maintenance and minor repairs were performed at the Town Hall, Annex and 

Municipal Garage throughout the year. 

Highway Division 
Norman Stone, Foreman 

The Highway Division, which is the largest in the Public Works Department, is 
charged with the maintenance and repairing of the Town's streets and drainage 
systems. The winter schedule consists mainly cf Snow and Ice Control and routine 
maintenance which does not require excavations. During the other three seasons, 
the men are kept busy with projects varying from road construction to street 
sweeping . 

Normal maintenance consists of patching streets, repairing drains and catchbasins 
and repairing sidewalks. A section of concrete sidewalk on South Main Street at 
Choate Bridge and a section on North Main Street was repaired. Drainage systems 
were installed on Linebrook Road, Kimball Avenue, Roberts Road, Lakeman's Lane, 
Juniper Street and Chebacco Road. Several plugged drains were cleared. All 
catchbasins were cleaned. 

A section of High Street from the State line through Lord's Square was resurfaced 
Argilla Road was reclaimed and resurfaced from Heartbreak Road to County Road. 

A total of 1,038 feet of steel beam guard rail was installed on Linebrook Road, 
North Ridge Road, East Street and Argilla Road. 

All Town roads and sidewalks were swept in the spring to rid them of winter sand 
deposits. Street sweeping was performed twice a week in the downtown area from 
April to December, with the exception of June and July when they were done three 
times weekly. 

Crosswalks, parking spaces and traffic lines were painted in the downtown area. 
As in previous years, crosswalks were painted green. Also, 171,695 lineal feet 
of center lines and fog lines were painted. 

Roadside mowing was done. All gravel roads were graded. 



-44- 



The Highway Division purchased two new trucks during 1984. 

Chapter 90 

Money was spent for engineering services for Fox Creek Bridge. 

Special Articles 

Mill Road Bridge had major repairs done to it in 1984. Town Hall renovations are 
nearly completed allowing the public the convenience of having all Town offices 
under one roof for the first time in many years. 

Forestry Division 
Robert Comeau, Leader 

The mitigation of the Dutch Elm Disease has again been one of the principal con- 
cerns of the Forestry Division. Approximately 175 beetle infested Elm trees were 
removed as well as Maples, Oaks, Lindens and Pines. 

Each first grade student was given an Ash tree to take home, plant and care for 
in observance of Arbor Day. 

The Forestry Division planted approximately 110 trees around Town. Also, they 
planted several trees for the local Garden Clubs. 

Spraying was done in several areas of Town to combat Elm Bark Beetle. 

Round-up and Krenite S was sprayed along several miles of roadside to control 
brush and weeds. Amate was used to control the spread of poison ivy. 

Other work performed by the Forestry Division consisted of trimming and pruning 
trees, cutting brush, roadside mowing, removing fallen trees, removing limbs, 
setting up voting booths for election and setting up for Annual and Special Town 
Meetings. 



RECREATION AND YOUTH DEPARTMENT 
Elizabeth M. Dorman, Director 

A wide variety of activities and programs were offered by the Recreation and 
Youth Department for the people of Ipswich. Children's offerings included summer 
swim instructions, tennis lessons, and a playground program with daily sports and 
arts and crafts activities, competitions, field trips, and special events such as 
the July 4th parade and field day and the Halloween parade and program. An after, 
school gym/swim program was initiated at the Beverly YMCA with transportation pro- 
vided to and from local schools. Other activities included introductory basket- 
ball, a series of trips and activities during school vacations, and a special 
children's Saturday program. 

The Teen-Age Drop-In Center at the Memorial Building was open on weekend nights 
during the whole year for a variety of activities including pool, ping-pong, 
floor hockey, T.V., trips for shopping, skating, skiing, and special activities 
included movies and dances. 

For adults, programs in volleyball and basketball were continued on Sundays and 
weekday evenings, and trips were organized to an ice show, the Boston Pops, and 
a dinner and theatre evening in Boston. Offerings at the Memorial Building in- 
cluded aerobics, dog obedience classes, CPR training, and senior citizens line 
dancing. Other senior citizen's activities included a special middle school con- 
cert and trips to Willowbrook Victorian Village, Lowell's Mill and Canal Tour, 



-45- 



Quincy Market and Boston Harbor, a Budweiser plant, Lake Winnipesaukee cruise, 
and shopping at the Fox Run Mall. 

Several special activities and events were organized for multi-age groups includ- 
ing a summer track program, the annual Ipswich Marathon, an outdoor block dance, 
and the summer community band. Many special events were also planned for the 
Town's 350th Anniversary celebration including the Great Ipswich River Raft Race. 
Another new event, a Mini -Triathalon, was held at Crane's Beach, and a volleyball 
net was installed there for use by Ipswich residents. A men's twilight Softball 
league encouraged greater evening use of the lighted facilities at Bialek Park, 
and a night supervisor was available there to handle lights and provide equipment 
for informal recreation activities such as volleyball, Softball, horseshoes and 
tennis . 

The Recreation Department again assumed responsibility for beach stickers and 
field use permits. A total of 5,800 stickers were issued for such things as 
full-time residents, summer residents, one day passes, fishermen and horse vans. 
A total of 269 permits were issued for Softball, basketball, and tennis use dur- 
ing spring and summer seasons. 

Continued cooperation with the School Department allowed a sharing of resources 
and facilities. Recreation programs were held in School gyms as well as on 
school fields and tennis courts. The School Department used fields at Bialek 
Park for some high school sports and the Memorial Building for pre-school screen- 
ing, cheerleading practice and a Great Books Training Seminar. Alliances were 
also contineud with other town agencies such as veterans' groups, senior citizen's 
groups, youth and adult sports groups, adult education, "Creative Ventures" chil- 
dren's offerings, Scout and Campfire groups, and the 350th Anniversary Committee. 
Some of the groups used the Memorial Building for meetings and registration 
activities. 

The Recreation Committee, composed of seven members of the community, and the 
Recreation Director met regularly througout the year to discuss recreation pro- 
grams, plans, and policies. Members of the Committee frequently helped in the 
supervision of many of the department's activities such as the Marathon, Hallow- 
een, Summer Track and vacation programs. Also, a large number of volunteers from 
the community helped out by coaching teams, chaperoning trips and supervising 
major recreation events. Their support has made it possible for us to continue 
offering a broad scope of activities for the people of Ipswich. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Marjorie Robie, Chairwoman 

During 1984, negotiation of a new contract with the Ipswich Teachers' Association 
occupied both time and effort. However, this negotiation process reaffirmed the 
intention of the School Committee to move steadily toward equitable salaries for 
teachers and concurrently to maintain facilities and equipment, and to provide 
appropriate materials of instruction. 

In addition, the School Committee: 
Approved policies on such varied topics as drugs, homework and bus conduct. 
Undertook a comprehensive study of curriculum to facilitiate long-range 

planning. 
Completed computer facilities in each school enabling e\/ery student to have 

computer training time. 



-46- 



Conducted the first School Committee public self-evaluation in this area. 
Welcomed 118 kindergarten students and graduated 128 seniors. 

The School Committee greatly appreciates the wide support for education from the 
citizens of Ipswich. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
Richard F. Thompson 

During 1984, the test scores for Ipswich students were increased from the year 
before in e\/ery major area of assessment. For this, we are all pleased. Cer- 
tainly the efforts of teachers, administrators, the School Committee, and the 
students should be applauded. 

The Curriculum and Instruction. Council , in conjunction with the staff, aided in 
this success with its work in the following areas: 

1. Reviewed and revised instructional goals and the homework policy 

2. Supported the writing project 

3. Mapped and reduced to writing the elementary math curriculum concepts 

4. Encouraged teachers to upgrade their teaching skills 

5. Provided summer workshops on computer related topics 

Further, 1984 saw improvement in our educational facilities. We painted and car- 
peted, cleaned and repaired or replaced school furniture and equipment. In one 
case, the high school library, we refurbished the entire facility. Unfortunately, 
the theft of the computers limited the computer program in two buildings. 

For several years Ipswich has had a declining student enrollment. In order to 
keep a reasonable financial balance, we have decreased our number of teachers as 
students decreased; however, 1984 seems to be marking a slowing of this trend. 
We actually saw an increase in students at our elementary level. This change may 
have significant effects in the future, if the growth continues. 

Lastly, I do want to comment on the long negotiation process between the Ipswich 
Teachers' Association and the Ipswich School Committee. Certainly, 13 months of 
negotiations for any organization does not help the overall atmosphere of an edu- 
cational instituion. The process was emotionally draining for everyone involved, 
and needs to be remembered as we again begin our negotiations in the fall of 1985. 

In summary, the 1983/1984 school year was an excellent one in terms of system-wide 
growth and achievement. 



HIGH SCHOOL 

Joseph R. Rogers, Principal 

Evidences of continued academic growth have persisted during the past few years. 
However, during 1983-1984 we saw an even more positive upward movement of test 
scores and pupils' academic growth. Our students continue to enjoy the benefits 
of a small, personalized high school which employs highly individualized methods 
of instruction. 

Our professional staff has provided outstanding services which have reflected in 
the overall excellent vocational and educational placement of our pupils after 
graduation. 



-47- 



The schools have been called upon to perform extra-ordinary human services. We 
now employ a non-teaching staff to assist pupils and their families through the 
years of adolescent turmoil which are often accompanied by upheavals in their 
domestic situations. Our teachers are called upon regularly to work with a 
variety of resource agencies who are attempting to aid the youngsters. As noted, 
the complexion of responsibilities of the classroom teacher are many. 

All curriculum areas are in a constant state of flux as in our society. Pupil 
needs are being met whenever possible. The computer is being utilized as a learn^ 
ing assist in all academic disciplines. 

Through the generosity of the School Committee, our pupils in Advance Placement 
programs now can receive partial funding for their A. P. exams. 

Anticipated decline in enrollment has not yet materialized; we still have 530 
pupils for whom we are providing services. The mood of the school at its closing 
in June was extremely positive. Summer employment opportunities for pupils 
abounded; in fact, we were unable to provide employers with employees as there 
were more jobs than workers. 



RALPH C. WHIPPLE MEMORIAL SCHOOL 
Ronald Landman, Principal 

During 1984 the Ralph C. Whipple Memorial School provided educational services 
to eighth, seventh and sixth grade students. The Middle School's tenet of offer- 
ing many academic/social/physical/emotional activities motivated numerous faculty 
to offer a wide range of services. 

Art teacher Ann Ayers entered students' works to the Globe Art Contest for the 
first time. The result was two gold key winners, the highest distinction in the 
regional competition. Music teacher Carolyn Sawyer supervised two major activi- 
ties. The first was the choral district competition in which several of our stu- 
dents excelled. Secondly, she coordinated the volunteerism of Mrs. Ayers, home 
economics teacher Sharyn Schnepel , industrial arts teacher Bill Jodz and choreog- 
rapher Page Mercer to produce the outstanding musical Jacob and the Amazing Tech- 
nicolor Dreamcoat". 

The physical education department, i.e., Ell i e Knowles and Steve Hopping, volun- 
teered time to coordinate monthly road races. They culminated this with the 
annual 4i mile trek "Run for the Sun" on Crane's Beach Picnic Day. 

In the academics, numerous faculty enriched the school programs. The most note- 
worthy was the science fair voluntarily coordinated by Teri Ebinger, John Ferrick 
and Karen Festa. More than two hundred students took advantage of this to ex- 
hibit their scientific creativity and expertise. Foreign language teachers Jean 
Cocuzzo and Elvira Borsari used activity periods to expose sixth grade students 
to French and Spanish. The math program continued to be enriched through local, 
regional, and national competition. Ms. Betty Sackrison's math team continued to 
finish impressively in competition with six neighboring school systems. Jayne 
Rotsko coordinated the social studies students for a very successful presidential 
debate followed by a school -wide mock election. English teachers, Louise Cynkus, 
Barry Hopping and Frank Vidmar, contributed time to allow student participation 
in the Salem Evening News Spelling Bee. In addition, media specialist Ethel 
Rooers wrote an excellent curriculum for teaching computer literacy in a middle 
school. Mrs. Linda McKenna, a guidance counselor, organized the third annual 
"Career Day". Mr. John Yeannakopoulos' Memorial Day Assembly once again aroused 
the sentiment of patriotism for students, faculty and community. 

-48- 



In summary, 1984 had to be evaluated as a wealthy year for all the students. All 
this directly resulted from faculty commitment. 



PAUL F. DOYON MEMORIAL SCHOOL 
William E. Waitt, Jr., Principal 

During 1984 Doyon School continued to offer a sound educational program centering 
on the basic skills with concerns for the improvement of the quality of our offer ■ 
ings. 

Staff concentrated on writing skills development and the complete overhaul of our 
mathematics curriculum. As a result of this study, a completely new math text 
was purchased and introduced in all classrooms, kindergarten through grade five. 

Continued growth in computer skills resumed with the replacment of our stolen 
computers in late April. The Burley Fund and the Brown School Fund donated money 
enough to purchase an additional two computer stations. We are very thankful for 
this support. 

September began our 20th year of service as the Town's newest school after a busy 
summer making needed repairs. New doors were required on the two rear entrances. 
Painting, univent work, roof repairs and the addition of handicapped toilet facil- 
ities completed our renewal work. 

An additional first grade was required to handle an unexpected increase in stu- 
dents. Our staff consists of 35 professional personnel with a service staff of 
12. The 444 students (as of October 01) were cared for by 19 teachers, one prin- 
cipal, eight specialists, three teacher aides, one guidance counselor, one librar- 
ian, a half-time nurse, two speech therapists and a part-time occupational thera- 
pist. A corps of service staff includes the secretary, three custodians, three 
part-time lunch aides, and three full-time and two part-time food service employ- 
ees. 

Two long-time employees, Lynne Clarkin, secretary of nine years, and Maudine Fee, 
teacher of 10 years' service, moved on to other exciting work. 

No report would be complete without a hearty thank-you for the enthusiastic sup- 
port of our parent group, the Friends of Doyon School, and the efforts of many 
Retired Senior Volunteer Program volunteers and others. Their help, the finan- 
cial support of the Town, and a professional, caring staff have combined to make 
us a strong, successful educational institution. 

****** 

WINTHROP SCHOOL 

Daniel P. Wilson, Principal 

The Winthrop School continues to provide a quality educational program for stu- 
dents from kindergarten through grade five. After the sixth graders were trans- 
ferred to the Middle School, this past year has been primarily a year of refining 
programs that exist for our students. A joint effort of teachers from the two 
elementary schools produced an updated math curriculum which has been distributed 
to all teachers. We have continued to implement and refine the computer curricu- 
lum which was initiated last year. All children from first grade on spend time 
learning computer skills each w^ek . The writing program which was started last 
year is continuing. 



-49- 



After holding at about 246 students throughout the spring of the year, enrollment 
has gradua.lly increased during the fall months to a total of 270 students at the 
end of December. Projections suggest that enrollment will continue to rise in 
the foreseeable future. 

We are greatly appreciative of the parental support and assistance we have exper- 
ienced at Winthrop School. Many individual parents have volunteered time to help 
in classrooms, the library and around school during the past year. Last spring 
we sent out 90 invitations to people who had volunteered their time to attend our 
annual Volunteer Tea. The Friends of Winthrop have provided tremendous support 
with a number of projects around school. Thank you to all who have helped. 

DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL SERVICES 
Elizabeth J. Geanakakis, Administrator 

Department goals addressed and accomplished during the 1983-1984 school year were 
as follows: 

1. To improve instruction and to implement for the Department of Special Ser- 
vices' teachers. 

2. Using the SEER data entry form, program on the Apple He all required infor- 
mation on 1983-1984 SPED students. 

3. Develop a committee to review literature and investigate existing computer- 
ized individual educational plans for possible adaptation in our school sys- 
tem. 

4. Solicit and encourage SPED parents at the elementary and middle school levels 
to link with existing parent friends' groups. 

5. Arrange for an inservice awareness and information exchange workshop for 
Collaborative (Ipswich, Hamilton/Wenham, Essex, Manchester and Rockport) SPED 
personnel . 

6. To update and revise the Ipswich Department of Special Services' Procedures 
Manual . 

7. To implement the writing program by John Collins, Ed.D. for all special edu- 
cation students who demonstrate the ability to benefit from the acitivites at 
this time. 

A Commonwealth Inservice Grant of $984 was developed by Mary Hurwitz, generic 
teacher at the Doyon School. The grant, "Parent Awareness Training" made parents 
aware of their rights and responsibilities under 766 evaluation process. 

Mr. Thompson, Superintendent, with final School Committee approval, redesigned an 
organizational chart of the Ipswich Public Schools reflecting responsibilities 
for supervision, budgeting, and interface between regular and special education. 
As a result of this process, approval was given to change the name of the Depart- 
ment of Special Education to that of Department of Special Services which more 
accurately reflects its composition of SPED teachers, aides, speech pathologists, 
school psychologist, school adjustment counselor, educational diagnostician, occu- 
pational therapist, pre-school , early childhood teacher, nurses, and special 
needs van drivers. 

Vi DeMille and Helen Barry, school nurses, developed an extensive Health Manual, 
a resource for requirements, procedures, and proper form use. 

High school guidance counselors, Joyce McNeill and Eileen Knakkergaard, with 
Betty Milligan as organizer and Eileen Linehan, their secretary, arranged for a 
highly successful "Women's Career Day". 



-50- 



During the 1983-1984 school year, department personnel held 131 team evaluations, 
screened 187 pre-school and pre-kindergarten children, and conducted 136 reviews 
(required yearly for SPED students). 



350th ANNIVERSARY COMMITTEE 
Joseph W. Carpenter, Chairman 

1984 was a year of celebration and unity in the Town of Ipswich. Celebrating our 
350th Anniversary, Ipswich ("The Birthplace of American Independence") sponsored 
a variety of activities, enjoyed by e\/ery aspect of townspeople. The following 
is a synopsis of the year's events hosted by your Town: 

• Colonial Ball at Castle Hill, where the Westbrook, CT Colonial Drum Corps per- 
formed and where the festivities were enjoyed by all of the costumed partici- 
pants. 

• Kick-Off Parade. The official opening ceremonies began with many marching 
units from numerous states performing on the high school football field. Arts, 
Crafts, and Food Booths sold their wares throughout the weekend. The history 
and raising of the liberty pole and a mock battle between the British and 
Militia were re-enacted. Also, many of the marching units camped on the high 
school grounds in 18th Century fashion. 

Although physically dampened by intense rains throughout the weekend, spirits 
were high! Impressed by the unity of Ipswich's townspeople, numerous marching 
units requested to reappear in the Town's Finale Parade. 

For your support during this weekend, the Committee genuinely thanks you! 

• Ipswich River Pagent. Directed by Janet Taisey Craft, the Ipswich Moving 
Company performed a dance in celebration of the River. 

t The Great Ipswich Fiddlers' Contest. Sponsored by the Ipswich Humane Group, 
the contest was a huge success! Although a first in Ipswich, the contest in- 
cluded participants throughout the New England States. 

• Community Fair. Antique cars, a money wheel, small carnival, two live bands 
and over 60 arts, crafts and food booths gathered on the grounds of Don Bosco. 
An original composition, by Florence Owsiak in honor of Ipswich, was debuted. 
Although competing with extreme heat, the Fair was enjoyed by all. 

• Carnival. A family-styled carnival was an obvious 'hit' with the younger 
townspeople! 

t The Great Ipswich River Raft Race. Thanks to the cooperation and assistance 
of the Ipswich Outboard Club, the first annual Great Ipswich River Raft Race 
was equally enjoyed by participants and observers! 

• Fireman's Muster. After years of absence, a Fireman's Muster once again took 
place in Ipswich. It was a fun-filled day for all ages! 

• 50's Dance. Co-sponsored by the K Club, over 500 former Teen Club Members and 
friends jammed into the K Club hall and joyously participated in a reunion. 

• Time Capsule. Sponsored by the Ipswich Historical Society, the community band 
performed and speeches were made by invited guests during the burial of the 



^51- 



Town's time capsule. The burial took place on the grounds of the Old South 
Parish House. An interesting object to be unearthed years from now! 

• Fireworks. For those of you who witnessed the display, we're confident you 
will agree that there are numerous adjectives to describe the exhibition: 
beautiful, brilliant, magnificent, etc.!! For those of you who were unable to 
observe the display, it is hoped that the 1984 fireworks were the first of an 
annual event. 



t 



Finale Parade. Marching units (from numerous states), floats, antique cars, 

the Town of Essex (which was a part of Ipswich in the 1600' s) and various 

other marchers were among many groups participating in the Town's grand Finale 
Parade. 

I know I speak for all the 350th Committee when I sincerely thank you, the Towns 
people of Ipswich, for your participation and support in celebrating the 350th 

Anniversary of our Town which we love so dearly! Thank you! 



TOWN CLERK 

Isobel N. Coulombe 

Comparative Vital Statistics recorded in the past four years: 

1981 1982 1983 1984 



Births 


139 


134 


145 


138 


Deaths 


94 


116 


110 


107 


Marriages 


83 


96 


111 


82 



There were 77 females and 61 males born to Ipswich residents in 1984. Of the 
total number of deaths recorded (59 males, 48 females), 98 were residents; the 
oldest resident was 105 years old, the youngest was 19 years old. Of the 82 
marriages recorded in Ipswich, 30 took place elsewhere; in 19 marriages, one 
party was a non-resident; in 15, both parties were non-resident. 



DOG LICENSES 1982 


1983 


1984 


Males 762 


674 


634 


Females 82 


64 


64 


Spayed Females 651 


608 


533 


Kennels 21 


25 


25 


Total 1516 


1371 


1256 


SHELLFISH LICENSES & PERMITS 


1984 


Resident Yearly 




178 


Resident Family 




94 


Resident Commercial 




80 


Non-resident Yearly 




91 


Non-resident Daily 




24 


Non-resident Commercial 




50 


Non-resident Commercial Rack 


Tickets 


2210 


"Over 60" Resident Recreational 


21 



2748 = $28,422.00 

Town Elections: 

The Annual Meeting for the Election of Town Officers was held in accordance with 

the Warrant on Monday, April 09, 1984 from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. The ballot 

box in Precinct 1 registered 649 ballots cast; in Precinct 2, 776; in Precinct 3, 



-52- 



551; in Precinct 4, 863; for a total of 2839 votes cast in the four precincts, 
out of 6927 registered voters. 

A Special Town Election, to fill a vacancy on the Board of Selectmen created by 
the death of Arthur S. LeClair, was held on Monday, October 29, 1984 from 10:00 
a.m. to 8:00 p.m. The ballot box in Precinct 1 registered 464 ballots cast; in 
Precinct 2, 513; in Precinct 3, 491; in Precinct 4, 571; for a total vote of 2039 
out of 7383 registered voters. 



TOWN COUNSEL 
Charles C. Dalton 

1984 was an active year on the legal front for the Town. A major civil rights 
suit against the Town in the Federal District Court involving the Town's refusal 
to issue building permits for undersized lots was dismissed by the Court; an 
appeal of the dismissal was taken by the lot owners; the Federal Court of Appeals 
has requested the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court to answer material issues 
of state law. The case is presently pending in the Sumpreme Judicial Court. 

A case involving the provision of public water supply by the Town to Treadwell's 
Island has been tentatively settled after pending for two years. 

There was the usual volume of litigation involving the enforcement of the Town's 
Zoning By-Law. 

A long-standing dispute between the Town and Local 1913, I.A.F.F. before the 
State Labor Relations Commission remained undecided, although the Commission has 
had the case under advisement for more than 14 months. 

Most of the potential litigation between various Town Boards and Officials and 
those affected by their decisions and enforcement were settled through good faith 
negotiations between the Town and various citizens. 

Suits against the Town for alleged negligence on the part of several Town employ- 
ees resulting in financial losses to various persons showed a dangerous and 
potentially expensive growth during 1984. 

The Town acquired the "Sylvania" parking lot off Peatfield Street; a major acqui- 
sition that should alleviate the congested parking in the downtown area for years 
to come. 

****** 

TREASURER-COLLECTOR 
George C. Mourikas 

The following bills were committed from the Assessor's Office for collection: 
Real Estate, Personal Property, Farm Excise, Boat Excise and Motor Vehicle Excise 

A schedule of receipts was rendered to the Town Accountant monthly. 

A record of Trust Fund transactions was maintained. 

All disbursements, both Town and School were processed through this office, and 
all receipts were deposited and faithfully recorded. 



-53- 



We have now implemented Excise, along with Real Estate, Personal Property and 
Water Collections with direct line terminal to a computer. 



VETERANS' SERVICES 

David E. Beeman, Director 




The Federal benefits processed by this Department are paid directly to those vet- 
erans who are eligible to receive such assistance. Over 90% of our activity 
stems from the Federal program. In the Town of Ipswich, approximately 1700 vet- 
erans and their dependents received $1,800,000 from the Veterans Administration. 
The community does not contribute to these benefits. 



WATER/SEWER DEPARTMENTS 
James E. Chase, Engineer 

Water Division 

Gilbert J. Elliott, Foreman 

The followinq extensions to our distribution system were added in 1984 

Hayward Street 8" CLDI - 981 Feet 
Hayward Street 10" CLDI - 675 Feet 



1982 



1983 



1984 



New Meters Installed 




26 




47 




34 


Meters Replaced 




59 




73 




141 


Services Turned Off 




76 




85 




88 


Services Turned On 




82 




103 




121 


New Services 




26 




33 




41 


Services Discontinued 









1 







Hydrants Installed 




5 




4 




1 


Hydrants Replaced 




2 




3 




2 


New Water Mains Installed 




2,800' 




2,165' 




1,655' 


Total Length of Mains 




407,140' 




409,305' 




410,960' 


Water Services 














Metered Services 




3,490 




3,538 




3,544 


Unmetered Services 




71 




76 




112 


Summer Services 




84 




84 




82 


Water Usage 














Dow' s Reservoir 


155, 


,828,000 


139 


,212,000 


206, 


,744,000 


Brown ' s Well 


49, 


,559,000 


70 


,665,000 


63 


,790,000 


Winthrop Wells 


20 


,237,000 


52 


,464,000 


16 


,554, '000 


Mile Lane Well 


15, 


,855,000 


18, 


,413,000 


14, 


,749,000 


Essex Road Well 


6 


,352,000 


19, 


,461,000 


17, 


,821,000 


Fellow's Road Well 


38 


,587,000 


37, 


,131,000 


22, 


,322,000 


Total Water Usage 


286 


,418,000 


337 


,346,000 


341, 


,980,000 



-54- 



Highest Day: 7/13/82 
Highest Day: 7/11/83 
Highest Day: 6/23/84 



1,605,000 



2,173,700 



2,014,000 



Sewer Division 

James J. Tebo, Chief Operator 

The following extensions to our sewer collection system were added in 1984 

Spring Street 8" PVC - 858 Feet 
Highland Avenue 8" PVC - 442 Feet 
Hayward Street 8" PVC - 390 Feet 



1982 



1983 



1984 



Sewage Treated Daily 

(Average Gallons) 
Total Sewage Treated 

(Gallons) 

Highest Daily Flow: 6/05/82 
Highest Daily Flow: 3/19/83 
Highest Daily Flow: 6/03/84 

Total Precipitation (Inches) 

Highest Daily Prec. 6/05/82 
Highest Daily Prec. 11/24/83 
Highest Daily Prec. 5/31/84 

Treatment 

Average Influent Suspended 

Solids mgl 
Average Effluent Suspended 

Solids mgl 
Average percent Removal, S.S 
Average Influent BOD5 mgl 
Average Effluent BOD5 mgl 
Average Percent Removal BOD5 
Average Eff 1 uent pH 

SI udge Dewatering 
Digested Sludge to Vacuum 

Filters (Gallons) 
Average Digested Sludge 

Percent Solids 
Vacuum Filter Sludge Cake to 

Disposal (Pounds) 
Average Vacuum Filter Sludge 

Cake % Solids 



858,000 1,016,000 983,000 

313,455,000 371,039,000 358,659,000 

2,899,000 

2,942,000 

2,768,000 

54.18 67.73 56.40 



2.80 



& 6/03/84 



Chemicals 



Total Chlorine 



Disinfection 

(Pounds) 
Sludge Dewatering: 

Lime (Pounds) 

Ferric Chloride (Pounds) 

Collection System 
New Sewer Connections 
Total Sewer Connections 



92 

4.2 
95 

101 

4.7 
95 

6.7 



1,700,700 

2.4 

293,457 

11.9 

8,336 

82,392 
30,450 



23 
1,378 



3.30 



93 

3.5 
96 
82 

4.7 
94 

6.7 



1,681,200 

2.4 

342,371 

11.3 

8,002 

93,924 
37,282 



26 
1,404 



2.65 



113 

4.9 
96 
92 

4.4 
95 

6.7 



2,356,400 

2.2 

437,074 

11.8 

8,162 

100,689 
38,182 



9 
1,413 



-55- 



WATER SUPPLY COMMITTEE 
James R. Engel , Chairman 

The efforts of the Water Supply Committee during Calendar Year 1984 were almost 
entirely devoted to activities related to the water filtration plant proposed for 
operation at Dow Brook Reservoir. 

The filtration plant preliminary design contract, initiated in June, 1983, was 
completd just prior to the Spring Town Meeting. The results of this design 
effort formed the basis of an article that was presented and subsequently adopted 
at Town Meeting. The article called for the detailed design and construction of 
a 2.5 million gallons per day water treatment plant, replacement of the Bull 
Brook Dam with a new and slightly larger structure, the design and construction 
of a hydraulic connection between Bull Brook Reservoir and Dow Brook Reservoir, 
and modification to the Dow Brook gate house and pump station. The article was 
overwhelmingly passed by Town Meeting. 

The final detailed design portion of the effort was initiated in June of 1984. 
All essential design details in the facility were completed by the end of the 
calendar year. The approximate timetable for the facility calls for design com- 
pletion by March of 1985, start of construction in mid to late summer 1985 and 
facility completion in late 1986. 



WATERWAYS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
George C. Scott, Jr., Chairman 

This past year the Waterways Advisory Committee has been working to improve the 
Ipswich Waterways and to obtain better surveillance by, and awareness of, the 
Harbormaster. 

The Coast Guard has agreed to add a can buoy to mark the old Crane breakwater on 
the south side of the mouth of the Ipswich River off Little Neck. The Harbor- 
master put in a buoy here last year and the Coast Guard will handle this in the 
future. Also, the Coast Guard will change the red and black horizontally banded 
nun buoy (the PI urn Island Shoal buoy) to a red nun buoy to better mark the rocks 
on the north side of the Ipswich River Channel off Little Neck. 

In addition, the Coast Guard has agreed to add a "star", indicating rocks, on 
chart 13282 at the indicated four foot depth just west of the Bass Rock Spindle 
at apporoximately Lat. 42° 41.8' N, Hor. 70° 47.1' W. There are believed to be 
other rocks in the Plum Island Sound Channel which are troublesome to the larger 
and deeper draft sailboats now navigating PI urn Island Sound and it is hoped these 
rocks can be located and marked. 

Considerable time has been spent analyzing the pros and cons of launching fees at 
the Town Wharf Launching Ramp, and a report has been submitted to the Selectmen. 
A launching fee would be a "user fee" and would ameliorate the cost of surveil- 
lance and maintenance of the Town Wharf Ramps and approaches. Many of the users 
of the Town Wharf Ramp are not residents of Ipswich, so an appreciable percent of 
these monies will come from outside Ipswich. 

The Harbormaster should be commended for instigating better channel markers in 
areas not handled by the Coast Guard. 



-56- 



After several years of working on boat mooring requirements, this subject appears 
to be in hand and it is noted that Boat Excise Taxes are now 500% greater than 
they were before our efforts were directed to this problem. This Committee now 
believes enough boat excise taxes will be collected so that mooring fees will not 
be required as long as the Selectmen continue to advocate that 100% of the taxes 
will be available for the Harbormaster's budget and waterways improvements. How- 
ever, a small processing fee might become desirable to cover the costs of paper- 
work, postage and boat sitckers, etc. associated with the mooring program. 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

James Theodosopoulos, Chairman 

In 1984, 93 petitions were presented to the Zoning Board of Appeals, a new record. 
Of these, six were withdrawn and four were dismissed. Of the remaining petitions, 
57 were requests for special permits, of which 54 were granted; 21 were requests 
for variances, of which six were granted; six were appeals from decisions of the 
building inspector, of which one was affirmed and five were reversed. 

During the year, William J. Murphy was re-appointed as a regular member for a 
five year term, and John R. Verani and Jeffry Simon were re-appointed as associ- 
ate members, each for a one year term. At its organizational meeting, the Board 
elected James Theodosopoulos and Allen G. Swan as Chairman and Vice Chairman, re- 
spectively. Later in the year Allen Swan resigned to accept appointment to the 
Finance Committee; he was replaced by Steven Brody. 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
REVENUE SHARING HANDICAPPED REGULATIONS 
This notice is published pursuant to the requirements of Section 51.55 of the 
Revenue Sharing Regulations, as published in the Federal Register on October 17, 
1983. Section 51.55 prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals be- 
cause of their handicapped status. 

The Town of Ipswich, Ipswich, Massachusetts advises the public, employees and job 
applicants that it does not discriminate on the basis of handicapped status in 
admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, its programs and activi- 
ties. 

The Town of Ipswich has designated the following (person or office) as the con- 
tact to coordinate efforts to comply with this requirement. Inquiries should be 
directed to: Name: George E. Howe 
Office: Town Manager 
Address: Town Hall, South Main Street 
Phone Number: 356-4848 

Hours: 8a.m. -7p.m. Mondays 

8a.m. -4p.m. Tues-Thurs 
8a.m.-12noon Fridays 



-57- 





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-69- 



TOWN OF IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

June 30, 1984 

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies 

The accounting policies for financial reporting purposes of the Town of Ipswich 
conform to generally accepted accounting principles for local governmental units 
except as indicated in note 2. The following is a summary of the significant 
accounting policies: 

A. Fund Accounting 

The Town reports its financial activities in several funds and one account 
group in order to comply with the limitations and restrictions placed on 
both the resources made available to the Town and the services provided. The 
various funds are grouped in the financial statements in this report into six 
generic fund types and three broad fund categories as follows: 

GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS 
General Fund 

The general fund is the general operating fund of the Town. It is used to 
account for all financial resources except those required to be accounted for 
in another fund. 

S pecial Revenue Fund - General Revenue Sharing 

This special revenue fund is used to account for the proceeds of the State 
and Local Fiscal Assistance Act and their expenditures as prescribed by the 
Office of Federal Revenue Sharing. 

Special Revenue Funds - Other 

This special revenue fund is used to account for the proceeds of specific 
revenue resources (other than general revenue sharing, expendable trusts or 
major capital projects) that are legally restricted to expenditures for spec- 
ified purposes. 

C apital Projects Fund 

The capital projects funds are used to account for financial resources to be 
used for the acquisition or construction of major capital facilities (other 
than those financed by proprietary funds and trust funds). 

PROPRIETARY FUND 
Sewer - Water - Electric Funds 

Sewer, water, electric funds are used to account for operations (a) that are 
financed and operated in a manner similar to private business enterprises - 
where the intent of the governing body is that the costs of providing goods 
or services to the general public on a continuing basis be financed or recov- 
ered primarily through user charges; or (b) where the governing body has de- 
cided that periodic determination of revenues earned, expenses incurred, and/ 
or net income is appropriate for capital maintenance, public policy, manage- 
ment control, accountability, or other purposes where all financial transac- 
tions are maintained as separate funds - namely, Sewer Fund, Water Fund, 
Electric Fund. 

FIDUCIARY FUNDS 
T rust and Agency Funds 

Trust and agency funds are used to account for assets held by the Town in a 
trustee capacity or as an agent for individuals, private organizations, other 
governments and/or other funds. These include expendable trust, nonexpendable 
trust and agency funds. Nonexpendable trust funds are accounted for in a 
manner that permits the periodic measurement of revenues earned, expenses in- 
curred and/or net income in order to demonstrate maintenance of capital. Ex- 

-70- 



pendable trust funds are accounted for in essentially the same manner as gov- 
ernmental funds. Agency funds are custodial in nature (assets equal liabili- 
ties) and do not involve measurement of results of operations. 

ACCOUNT GROUP 
Long-Term Debt and Liabilities - Long-term liabilities expected to be financed 
from governmental funds are accumulated in the general long-term debt group 
of accounts. This account group is not a fund. It is only concerned with 
the measurement of financial position and, therefore, is not involved with a 
measurement of the results from any operations. 

B. Basis of Accounting 

The accompanying financial statements, except for the enterprise fund as 
noted below, have been prepared principally on the modified accrual basis of 
accounting. This method recognizes revenues when they become measurable and 
available. Expenses are recognized under this method as they are incurred. 

The accompanying financial statements of the enterprise fund have been pre- 
pared and presented on the accrual basis of accounting. Under this method, 
revenues are recognized in the accounting period in which they are earned 
and expenses are recognized when the related liability is incurred. 

Revenue Recognition 

Property tax revenues are recognized as revenue when they become available. 
Available means then due, or past due and receivable within the current peri- 
od, or expected to be collected soon enough thereafter to be used to pay 
liabilities of the current period. 

All other revenues are recognized throughout the year when cash is received. 
Receipts during the fifteen days immediately following the close of the fis- 
cal year are also recognized as available revenue 

In applying the susceptible to accrual concept to intergovernmental revenues, 
the legal and contractual requirements of the numerous individual programs 
are used as guidance. There are, however, essentially two types of these 
revenues. In one, monies must be expended on the specific purpose or project 
before any amounts will be paid to the Town, therefore, revenues are recog- 
nized based upon the expenditures recorded. In the other, monies are virtu- 
ally unrestricted as to purpose of expenditure and are usually revocable only 
for failure to comply with prescribed compliance requirements. These re- 
sources are reflected as revenues at the time of receipt or earlier if the 
susceptible to accrual criteria is met. 

Expenses 

Expenditures are recorded during the year on a cash disbursement basis. In 
addition, as required by Massachusetts General Laws, disbursements made dur- 
ing the fiften days immediately following the close of each fiscal year and 
which pertain to the prior year are recorded as expenses as of June 30th. 

Purchase orders outstanding at June 30th related to annual operating expenses 
are recorded as encumbrances and, accordingly, as a reservation of fund bal- 
ances at that date. 

GAAP Basis Amounts - Property taxes on the combined statement of revenues and 
expenditures - budget and actual - general and revenue sharing funds (exhibit 
3) has been stated on full accrual basis. 

Property taxes, as reported on the GAAP basis statements have been adjusted 
as follows: 

-71- 



Property Taxes Actual $5,679,635.24 

Add: Property taxes committed as of June 30, 
1984 but not collected within sixty (60) 
days after the end of that fiscal year 59,075.00 

Property taxes actual adjusted to a budgetary 

(non-GAAP) basis $5,620,560.24 

2. Departures from Generally Accepted Accounting Principles 

During 1981, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts issued a revised uniform municipal 
accounting system entitled "U.M.A.S." The departures from 6. A. A. P. under this 
revised system have been significantly narrowed. The Town has adopted the re- 
vised uniform municipal accounting system entitled U.M.A.S. since 1981. 

The significant departures from G.A.A.P. included in the Town of Ipswich's finan- 
cial statements are: 

A. Retirement benefits are provided for on a "pay-as-you-go" basis rather than 
an acceptable actuarial cost method (note 8). 

B. General fund fixed asset acquisitons are recorded as expenditures at the time 
purchases are made rather than being capitalized in a general fixed asset 
group of accounts . 

C. Purchases for materials and supplies inventories are recorded as expenditures 
rather than assets at the time of purchase. 

3. Deferred Revenue 

Property taxes and other revenues that are measurable but not available have been 
classified as deferred revenue on June 30, 1984 as follows: 



Outstanding property taxes June 30, 1984 $70,806.30 
Less: Collections July and August, 1984 59,075.00 



$ 11,731.30 



Motor vehicle, boat and farm excise net of 

collections from July 01 to July 15, 1984 

amounting to $44,067.01 429,405.67 

Tax Liens 34,261.11 

Departmental s-general fund 634.82 

Departmental s-special revenue fund 46,742.93 

Apportioned and suspended special assessments 108,448.35 

Committed interest 1,732 .13 

$632,956.31 ' 

Provision for Property Tax Abatements and Exemptions 

Provisions for property tax abatements and exemptions are established for each 
annual tax levy as prescribed by statute. The primary intent is to provide for 
these potential refunds or allowances during the year in which the tax would 
otherwise be due and collected. Excessive amounts no longer necessary are trans- 
ferred to fund balance reserved for extraordinary or unforeseen expenses as pre- 
scribed by the Massachusetts General Laws. 

Statutory provision for abatements and exemptions on June 30, 1984 are as follows 

Tax Levy of 1984 $193,164.41 

Tax Levy of 1983 98,824.06 

Tax Levy of 1982 58,228.43 

Tax Levy of 1981 21,472.77 

Tax Levy of 1980 16,514.76 

Tax Levy of 1979 20,025.34 

-72- 



Tax Levy of 1978 18,740.84 

Tax Levy of 1977 15,039.77 

Tax Levy of 1976 18,000.09 

Tax Levy of 1974 127.38 

Tax Levy of 1974 906.31 

Tax Levy of 1972 62.72 

$461,106.88 

Reserve for Extraordinary or Unforeseen Expenses 

The balance in this account represents the transfer of excess amounts from the 
"Provision for Abatement and Exemption" accounts. This account was previously 
known or classified as "Overlay Surplus" to be appropriated by town meeting vote 
for extraordinary or unforeseen expenses in accordance with Chapter 59, Section 
25, Massachusetts General Laws. 

Reserve for Encumbrances 

The balance in this account is made up of current and prior years unexpended 

appropriations carried forward. 

Unreserved Fund Balance - Designated 

Certain budgetary surpluses and deficits must, according to the General Laws of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, be utilized to reduce or be raised in the next 
subsequent tax rate. These items have been included within the unreserved fund 
balance pursuant to G.A.A.P. but have been connoted as designated for identifica- 
tion purposes. These items included the following: 







REVENUE 


SPECIAL 


CAPITAL 






GENERAL 


SHARING 


REVENUE 


PROJECTS 






FUND 


FUND 


FUND 


FUND 


TRUST FUND 


Designated to reduce 










the 1985 tax levy 


$933,678.72 


$305,200.00 


$18,169.00 


$7,212.33 


$29,252.00 


State and County over 












(under) assessments, 












net 


(3,257.39) 










Appro, deficits 


(113,577.38) 
$816,843.96 


$305,200.00 










$18,169.00 


$7,212.33 


$29,252.00 



The amount designated to reduce the 1985 tax levy was voted from avail ble funds 
by town meeting during the spring 1984 Annual Town Meeting. 

State and County over/underassessments, net, result from an excess of amounts 
raised in the tax levy of the current year as compared to the actual expenditures 
made for such purposes. These amounts will be utilized to reduce the 1985 tax 
levy. They are comprised of the following: 

Overassessments: 

County Assessment tax - 1984 $ .39 

State Assessment for Recreation 2,522.00 

State Assessment for Ipswich Watershed 20.00 

State Assessment for Cape Ann Transit 248.00 

State Assessment for Mosquito Control 2,340.00 $4,130.39 

Underestimates: 
State Assessment for Special Education (428.00) 
State Assessment for Auditing Municipal 
Accounts (1.00) 

State Assessment for Air Pollution (444.00) (873.00) 

$3,257.39 



-73- 



Appropriation deficits resulted from expenditures of the accounts listed that 
exceeded their appropriation during the fiscal year. 

Gasoline Tank Expenses $ 69,691.02 

Snow and Ice Control - Expenses 40,386.36 
Court Judgement 3,500.00 = $113,577.38 

Pension Plans 

Substantially, all employees of the Town, except school teachers and certain 
other school department employees are members of the Essex County Retirement 
System. The pension plan provides retirement benefits for members who have 
attained a certain age and for periods of service. Members contribute certain 
percentages of their salaries or wages to the plan. In addition, the Massachu- 
setts Division of Insurance determines an amount, each year, that the Town must 
contribute to the system in order to meet that year's projected benefit payment. 
The Town's contribution to the system for the year eneded June 30, 1984 amounted 
to $491,755.00. 

This so called "pay-as-you-go" method does not provide for the funding of any 
unfunded liabilities that might exist as a result of an actuarial determination 
of the fiscal condition of the plan. The amount of the unfunded liability of the 
Essex County Retirement System is actuarialy determined periodically and reported 
to the Town by the Massachusetts Retirement Law Commission. The most recent 
actuarial valuation was prepared as of January 01, 1979. At that date, the 
actuarialy computed value of unfunded pension benefits attributable to the Town 
of Ipswich amounted to $5,856,650. 

Teachers and certain administrative employees of the School Department participate 
in a contributory retirement plan administered by the Massachusetts Teachers' 
Retirement Board. The Town does not contribute to this plan. 

Unemployment Compensation 

The Town is on the reimbursable method for paying unemployment compensation. 
Under the reimbursable method, the Massachusetts Employment Security Division 
sends a list quarterly to the community of who has received benefits. The com- 
munity then reimburses the Massachusetts Employment Security Divison for these 
claims against the Town. 

Workmen's Compensation 

The Town insures its workers with Utica National Insurance Company, which com- 
putes its premium by estimating the Town's payroll and utilizing the rates per 
hundred established by the State Division of Insurance. 

Vacation and Sick Pay 

Employees earn vacation and sick leave as they provide services. Vacation accum- 
ulation is limited to the current year. Sick leave accumulates for various 
groups of employees based upon the respective collective bargaining agreements. 
Sick leave accumulates at the rate of one and one-quarter days per month. Maxi- 
mum sick leave accumulation is 150 days for firefighters, 165 days for policemen, 
and 165 days for all other town employees. The cost of vacation and sick leave 
benefits is accounted for as an operation expenditure of the general fund, when 
paid. Sick leave benefits are paid only when taken and, therefore, not paid to 
employees upon termination. The accumulated sick leave benefits on June 30, 1984 
have not been determined. 

Summary of Long-Term Debt 

A. Long-Term Debt Transactions 

Bonds payable on June 30, 1984 amounting to $1,241,200 are secured by the 
general revenue raising powers of the Town which are restricted by the enact- 

-74- 



ment of legislation during 1980. This legislation is best known as Proposi- 
tion 2b* 

B. Annual Debt Service 

Principal and interest payments due in future years relating to debt outstand' 
ing on June 30, 1984 are listed below: 











TOTAL 


FISCAL YEAR 


PRINCIPAL 


INTEREST 


REQUIREMENT 


1985 


$290,000.00 


$ 56,053.00 


T~ 


346,053.00 


1986 


204,200.00 


37,103.90 




241,303.90 


1987 


149,000.00 


23,486.50 




172,486.50 


1988 


149,000.00 


13,358.75 




162,358.75 


1989 


71,500.00 


3,427.75 




74,927.75 


1990 


10,000.00 


290.00 




10,290.00 




$873,700.00 


$133,719.90 


IT 


,007,419.90 



*The following is a summary of the long-term debt transactions, Town of Ipswich 
for the year ended June 30, 1984: 



-75- 



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****** 
BURLEY EDUCATION FUND 

Balance on Hand January 01, 1984 $22,519.65 

Income from Funds for Year 1984 as follows: 

Interest: Ipswich Co-operative Bank/Money Market Certificate 2,222.28 

Expenditures for the Year 1984 as follows: 

Apple Computer, Inc. (Computer System For Doyon Memorial School)... 1,700.00 
Balance on Hand January 01, 1985 as follows: 

Ipswich Co-operative Bank Money Market Certificate 23,041.93 

Respectfully submitted, 

V. James DiFazio, Treasurer 

****** 
FEOFFEES OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL 

Balance, July 01, 1983 $ 7,030.49 

Cash Received 213,582.32 

220,612.81 
Expenditures 205,404.69 

Balance, June 30, 1984 1 15,208.12 



Little Neck, valued at $2,030,560.00 

Buildings - Community Center & Barn 33,090.00 

Cash in First National Bank of Ipswich 15,208.12 
On Deposit - Ipswich Savings Bank $5,801.49 

Interest 537.87 6,339.36 
On Deposit - Ipswich Savings Bank 7,595.75 

Interest 227.78 7,823.53 
On Deposit - Ipswich Savings Bank 1,886.48 

Interest 57.97 1,944.45 

On Deposit - Ipswich Co-operative Bank 13,207.51 

Savings Certificates - Ipswich Savings Bank 24,360.34 

Ipswich Co-operative Bank 2,233.76 

$2,134,767.07 



SCHEDULE I 

CASH RECEIPTS 

July 01, 1983 - June 30, 1984 

Rents & Land Taxes $ 78,341.01 

Building Taxes 120,904.06 

Late Payment Interest & Miscellaneous 2,736.73 

201,981.80 
Transfer Certificate 12,329.79 

214,311.59 
Less Bad Checks 729.27 



$213,582.32 



-91- 



SCHEDULE A 
RECONCILIATION OF CASH BALANCE 

Balance, July 01, 1983 $ 7,030.49 

Cash Receipts - Schedule I 213,582.32 

220,612.81 
Expenditures - Schedule II 205,404.69 

$ 15,208.12 



SCHEDULE II 
EXPENDITURES 
July 01, 1983 - June 30, 1984 



Taxes - Town of Ipswich 




$181,207 


.93 


Repairs & Upkeep - Water 


$7,279.48 






Wharf 


743.60 






Community Center 


331.81 






Playground 


661.63 






Tree Work 


2,594.20 






Hot Topping Road 


421.11 


12,031 


.83 


Salaries & Expenses - Salaries 


4,750.00 






Transportation 


1,800.00 






Police 


2,574.00 






Legal 


600.00 






Telephone 


149.33 






Meetings & Dinners 


289 . 60 






Office Supplies 


276.00 






Insurance 


1,726.00 


12,164 


.93 






$205,404 


.69 



-92- 









IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 2122 00162 131 1 



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ROWLEY PRINTING, INC. 

ROWLEY, MASS.